Welcome to www.BertKelly.info

Who’s Bert Kelly? Demoted from the Coalition frontbench (1967-69), denied frontbench return, disendorsed as Federal Liberal Member for the South Australian seat of Wakefield (1958-77) and dropped by The Australian Financial Review (1969-80), The Bulletin (1980-85) and The Australian (1985-87), his much-anticipated funeral was attended by the good and the great from across the political spectrum (1912-97). The consensus from everyone — including his long-suffering wife Mavis, his tolerant neighbour Fred the farmer and his most trusted academic adviser Eccles the economist — is that he was soft, overpaid and lazy.

Bert Kelly has been a staff member of Economics.org.au since 2010. He is a staff member because we employ his work. No one else had republished his writings in a generation (until The Bert Kelly Research Centre’s book was published in October 2012, which I discuss here).  One item we republished for the first time in 33 years, attracted this accolade from world-renowned Bastiat scholar Dr David Hart: “Very nicely written. Bastiat would have been proud to have penned something like this! It is funny AND clever.”

(a.) Bert Kelly’s One More Nail (1978) (14 items)
(b.) Bert Kelly and others on the Modest Members Society (8 items)
(c.) Bert Kelly’s Parliamentary Speeches (2 items, with link to all others)
(d.) Bert Kelly’s Modest Member/Farmer Column (1969-87) (231 items)
(e.) Columns republished in 1982 in Economics Made Easy (87 items)
(f.) Other Bert Kelly works and mentions (38 items)
(g.) Dave’s Diary/Clarkson Says (21 items)
(h.) Bert Kelly’s Economics in Eight Easy Lessons
(i.) Bert Kelly’s 1980 feather bed series (20 items)
(j.) Bert Kelly on the car industry (20+ items)
(k.) Gina Rinehart Should Take Blame Indiscriminately, a Kelly highlight reel, analysing his shit-stirring modesty and showing how it can help Gina

One_More_Nail_Bert_Kelly(a.) Bert Kelly’s One More Nail (1978)

  1. Introduction — Bert Kelly on the Political Process.
  2. Chapter 1 — Writing on the Wall: explains that tariffs equal high prices plus world war.
  3. Chapter 2 — Family History
  4. Chapter 3 — Pre-Parliament Life
  5. Chapter 4 — Into Parliament: Bert Kelly enters Parliament.
  6. Chapter 5 — Northern Territory: Bert Kelly feels a dam coming on at each election.
  7. Chapter 7 — Tariffs Introduced
  8. Chapter 8 — More About Tariffs
  9. Chapter 11 — Journalisma context-setting summary of Bert Kelly’s career in journalism by Kelly himself.
  10. Chapter 12 — Public Works Committee — Excerpt: Bert Kelly admits he should have had less faith in politicians
  11. Chapter 13 — Rural Problems
  12. Chapter 16 — Some Sacred Cows
  13. Chapter 18 — Experiences in Parliament: Bert Kelly outwits Howard.
  14. Chapter 19 — Relationships with the Liberal Party: Excerpt: “Socialism has not been fostered so much by the Labor Party as by the Liberal Party encouragement of policies which are thought to be attractive to the people at election time. Once we have propounded them, these then became part of our doctrine, even if we know that they are in direct conflict with principles of self help and self reliance in which we say we always believe. The main plank in our platform is that it is essential to keep Labor out of government, which is a nicer way of saying keeping us in … I repeat, the main principle in which we believe is the utter necessity of keeping Labor out of government and in the pursuit of this end we are prepared to compete bitterly with the Labor Party in propounding socialist policies.”

(b.) Bert Kelly and others on the Modest Members Society

  1. Gary Sturgess, “Move for a body of Modest Members,” The Bulletin, June 2, 1981, pp. 26-28. Excerpt: “Kelly, modestly, plays down his own importance. He says that the ‘free marketeers’ have a wider vision than he did, and are having more success because of it.”
  2. A Modest Farmer [Bert Kelly], “Striped trousers at the ready,” The Bulletin, June 16, 1981, p. 123. Reprinted in Economics Made Easy (Adelaide: Brolga Books, 1982), pp. 191-93, as “Modest Members Association.”
  3. A Modest Farmer [Bert Kelly], “Tariff winds now blowing favourably,” The Bulletin, August 11, 1981, p. 100. Excerpt: “But the most exciting straw in the wind is the proposed launching of The Modest Members’ Society which will take place on August 14. Five years ago it would have been impossible to get such a group together but with the wind coming round from another direction, and the grim examples of the failure of most government interventions so obvious, even the ‘Nervous Nellies’ are trying to screw their courage up to be brave and are hoping to discover minds of their own.”
  4. Michelle Grattan, “Modest Farmer sees his ideas take hold,” The Age, August 14, 1981, p. 13. Excerpt: “The smaller government battle didn’t become the cause it should have with me — I was so busy after the tariff hare. That’s the difference between me and this group. They have a wider vision — I had tunnel vision.”
  5. Peter Shack, “The Society of Modest Members,” Optimism, Sept. 1981, p. 8.
  6. Bert Kelly on the unusual self-evident simplicity of the Modest Members Society — “What the market will bear,” The Bulletin, August 14, 1984, p. 124.
  7. modest members society — John Hyde, “Why ideas people should club together,” The Weekend Australian, September 29-30, 1990, p. 20.
  8. Nick Richardson, “Modesty ablaze,” The Bulletin, April 30, 1996, pp. 48-49.

(c.) Bert Kelly’s Parliamentary Speeches

  1. Bert Kelly’s Maiden Parliamentary Speech
  2. Interesting 1964 Bert Kelly Speech: he says he is not a free trader and that he supports protection!
  3. You can read all of Bert Kelly’s parliamentary speeches and parliamentary mentions by searching Bert Kelly here.

(d.) Bert Kelly’s Modest Member/Farmer Column (1969-87)

  1. First Modest Member Column — “That economist may be right, but …”, The Australian Financial Review, November 28, 1969, p. 3.
  2. Second Modest Member Column — “That economist, Mr Eccles, is at it again,” The Australian Financial Review, December 5, 1969, p. 3.
  3. Third Modest Member Column — “Where did the orderly markets go?” The Australian Financial Review, December 12, 1969, p. 3.
  4. Fourth Modest Member Column — “Oh I’m popular, but am I right?” The Australian Financial Review, December 19, 1969, p. 3.
  5. Fifth Modest Member Column — “Down at the silos — wheat quotas for sale?” The Australian Financial Review, January 2, 1970, p. 3.
  6. Sixth Modest Member Column — “Why the wheat industry leaders are no pin-up boys,” The Australian Financial Review, January 9, 1970, p. 3.
  7. Holding a loaded wallet to an economist’s head (a series comprising the following four articles) — “There’s no satisfying Farmer Fred,” The Australian Financial Review, February 20, 1970, p. 3.
  8. “Counting the cost of wool compensation,” The Australian Financial Review, February 27, 1970, p. 3.
  9. “Eccles keep his cool with $100m cheque,” The Australian Financial Review, March 6, 1970, p. 3.
  10. “Economists are queer about money,” The Australian Financial Review, March 13, 1970, p. 3.
  11. Do we want our money to fly?,” The Australian Financial Review, June 12, 1970, p. 3. Against subsidised airports and tourism.
  12. Can a bear be sure of a feed?,” The Australian Financial Review, July 10, 1970, p. 3.
  13. One small step on the compulsory voting landmine — “Compulsory voting — new lesson in letting sacred cows (like sleeping dogs) lie?,” The Australian Financial Review, September 11, 1970, p. 3.
  14. The free and compulsory education sacred cows have no clothes — “Should we continue to educate the unwilling?,” The Australian Financial Review, October 9, 1970, p. 3.
  15. “Can we judge students by the amount of hair on their heads?,” The Australian Financial Review, November 13, 1970, p. 3. Included at the end of article linked immediately above.
  16. Is it time to get aboard the tariff band-waggon?,” The Australian Financial Review, November 27, 1970, p. 3.
  17. Why farmers resent tariff protection for motor makers,” The Australian Financial Review, December 4, 1970, p. 3.
  18. Eccles Law of the constant wage share,” The Australian Financial Review, January 22, 1971, p. 3.
  19. How to end that national sport of tax avoidance,” The Australian Financial Review, April 23, 1971, p. 3.
  20. Death duty the death of us all,” The Australian Financial Review, April 30, 1971, p. 3.
  21. Once more unto the (tax) breach,” The Australian Financial Review, May 7, 1971, p. 3.
  22. Fred’s Golden Rule: Keep any government as far as possible from farming — “Will help for farmers get votes?,” The Australian Financial Review, May 14, 1971, p. 3.
  23. Giving the States cash — and power,” The Australian Financial Review, July 16, 1971, p. 3. I think this is the earliest instance of: “Before each election I can always feel a dam coming on.”
  24. Is the Budget a cargo cult?,” The Australian Financial Review, August 13, 1971, p. 3.
  25. Will we end up subsidising one another?,” The Australian Financial Review, August 20, 1971, p. 3.
  26. Subsidising only small farmers means subsidising big banks — “Would Fred fleece the wool subsidy?,” The Australian Financial Review, September 3, 1971, p. 3.
  27. The $2,000 song of the shirt worker,” The Australian Financial Review, September 24, 1971, p. 3.
  28. No pity for the poor graduates,” The Australian Financial Review, January 14, 1972, p. 3
  29. Why carry a $300m car subsidy?,” The Australian Financial Review, March 10, 1972, p. 3.
  30. Is free healthcare worthless? — “The fruit of specialist sideboards,” The Australian Financial Review, March 30, 1972, p. 3.
  31. The Govt’s helping hand often hurts,” The Australian Financial Review, April 21, 1972, p. 3.
  32. Tariff feather beds for the foreign giants,” The Australian Financial Review, June 16, 1972, p. 3.
  33. So why not learn now, pay later?,” The Australian Financial Review, July 21, 1972, p. 3.
  34. Bert Kelly in 1972 on Foreign Ownership of Australian Farmland and Warren Truss, Barnaby Joyce and Bill Heffernan in 2012 — “Don’t arrive late at my State funeral,” The Australian Financial Review, September 29, 1972, p. 3.
  35. Bert Kelly’s Satirical Prophecy: Minister for Meteorology (tick) and High Protectionist Policies to Result in War Yet Again (?) — “Even Canute couldn’t stem political tides,” The Australian Financial Review, December 29, 1972, p. 3.
  36. Why take in one another’s washing?,” The Australian Financial Review, January 12, 1973, p. 3.
  37. The problem of principles v popularity,” The Australian Financial Review, February 16, 1973, p. 3.
  38. Gillard’s galley-powered waterskiing — “The handout honeymoon’s nearly over,” The Australian Financial Review, February 23, 1973, p. 3.
  39. Bert Kelly breaks the law, disrespects government and enjoys it — “Farmer Fred found in good spirits,” The Australian Financial Review, March 16, 1973, p. 3.
  40. It’s hard to digest this economic cake,” The Australian Financial Review, March 30, 1973, p. 3.
  41. Fred’s too poor to have principles,” The Australian Financial Review, June 29, 1973, p. 3. Federalism, funding local government, etc.
  42. Bert Kelly on looking to politicians for moral leadership — “A modern Moses for the masses?,” The Australian Financial Review, July 6, 1973, p. 3.
  43. Still plenty of shelter behind tariff wall,” The Australian Financial Review, July 27, 1973, p. 3. On Whitlam’s July 1973 25% across the board tariff cut.
  44. Under Labor, is working hard foolish?,” The Australian Financial Review, August 3, 1973, p.3.
  45. Should we put up with socialism?,” The Australian Financial Review, October 26, 1973, p. 3.
  46. We’re quick to get sick of socialism,” The Australian Financial Review, November 23, 1973, p. 3.
  47. The inspirational incentivising Dear Leader Gough Whitlam — “Fred puts his sole into new ‘Blue Poles’,” The Australian Financial Review, December 21, 1973, p. 3.
  48. You can’t pull the wool over Farmer Fred,” The Australian Financial Review, January 11, 1974, p. 3. Mocks the constant claim that this-or-that is the result of “research in depth”. Excerpt: “‘Research’ by itself is eminently respectable, but ‘research in depth’ is quite irresistible.”
  49. Moss Cass: “Flood plains are for floods” — “Dr Cass sets a dam(ned) precedent,” The Australian Financial Review, February 1, 1974, p. 3.
  50. Labor: a girl who couldn’t say no,” The Australian Financial Review, April 19, 1974, p. 3. Yes, the title used on Economics.org.au for this article is the same title used in the AFR 37 years ago, before Julia Gillard’s Prime Ministership and the suggestions of forcing an early election over the carbon tax. Also of relevance is that six months earlier, in October 1973, a Modest Member column titled “Should we put up with socialism?” suggested that the Whitlam government should stay on, so we would all be forced to learn about the evils of socialism by getting it stuffed in our faces, and so we wouldn’t be able to say that they chickened out and that it would have turned out fine.
  51. They get the wind up when it changes,” The Australian Financial Review, November 1, 1974, p. 3.
  52. Bert Kelly recommends Ayn Rand — “Leo’s growl descends to a squeak,” The Australian Financial Review, November 8, 1974, p. 3.
  53. Difficult to be fast on your feet when you’ve got your ear to the ground — “It’s footwork that counts, Mavis nags,” The Australian Financial Review, November 22, 1974, p. 3.
  54. It would surprise people to see how sensible MPs behave if they think they are not being watched — “We’re not as silly as we sound,” The Australian Financial Review, November 29, 1974, p. 3.
  55. What is the sense in making the effort to look after yourself? — “You can lead a horse to water, but …,” The Australian Financial Review, December 6, 1974, p. 3. Two years later a column appeared with the same title, by the same author, in the same newspaper — “You can lead a horse to water, but …,” The Australian Financial Review, September 17, 1976, p. 3 —, but it’s different.
  56. Fondling one another’s glass haloes,” The Australian Financial Review, December 20, 1974, p. 3.
  57. Politician sacrifices his … honesty — “RED jobs will put us in the red,” The Australian Financial Review, January 24, 1975, p. 3.
  58. Bert Kelly reduces government to its absurdities — “… then I had a flash of inspiration,” The Australian Financial Review, January 31, 1975, p. 3.
  59. Fire in their guts and wind in ours,” The Australian Financial Review, February 7, 1975, p. 3.
  60. Handouts for big boys only,” The Australian Financial Review, May 16, 1975, p. 3.
  61. ‘He whom the gods would destroy …’,” The Australian Financial Review, May 23, 1975, p. 3.
  62. Should free universal healthcare include pets? — “Let’s try it on Fido, says Mavis,” The Australian Financial Review, June 27, 1975, p. 3.
  63. Can we get off the stomach-churning head-spinning tariff merry-go-round? — “The rewards for taking in the washing,” The Australian Financial Review, July 25, 1975, p. 3.
  64. Mr Clunies-Ross of the Cocos Islands should rule Australia — “Why should they just sit in the sun?,” The Australian Financial Review, September 26, 1975, p. 3.
  65. What if the whole country is swindled?,” The Australian Financial Review, October 10, 1975, p. 3.
  66. Heads roll — Mavis smells an election,” The Australian Financial Review, October 17, 1975, p. 3.
  67. Whitlam & co on the Dismissal — “It’s time to roll out those high principles,” The Australian Financial Review, October 31, 1975, p. 3. Excerpt: “In the present crisis the good and great of both sides have been quick to appeal to points of high principle and this has tended to confuse everyone, including me.”
  68. Why Bert Kelly was not even more publicly outspoken — “Kiss every baby, lick every boot?” The Australian Financial Review, January 23, 1976, p. 3.
  69. Good directions when government backseat driving, like reversing down wrong side of road — “Why Govt didn’t throttle car industry,” The Australian Financial Review, June 18, 1976, p. 4.
  70. “Gear change troubles in attitudes to car industry,” The Australian Financial Review, June 25, 1976, p. 4. Included in link immediately above.
  71. More funds to train Olympians?,” The Australian Financial Review, August 6, 1976, p. 4. Excerpt: “If we wanted to create goodwill we would ban all Government-backed international sporting events, not encourage them.”
  72. Barriers to imports are barriers to exports — “Tariff aid amounts to $2,000m,” The Australian Financial Review, August 13, 1976, p. 4.
  73. Is Taxmania a politician fetish? — “If you want to be loved, go to Tasmania,” The Australian Financial Review, August 27, 1976, p. 6.
  74. WEATHER IS USUALLY UNUSUAL — “The mixture as before — in capitals …,” The Australian Financial Review, January 28, 1977, p. 3.
  75. Keeping the bucket of worms alive,” The Australian Financial Review, February 18, 1977, p. 3.
  76. Why does Govt wear two faces?The Australian Financial Review, March 18, 1977, p. 3. Excerpt: “Perhaps the Prime Minister had two speech writers and they can’t get on with each other — there must be some such explanation.”
  77. Which comes first, goods or services?,” The Australian Financial Review, March 25, 1977, p. 3.
  78. Health cover needs a $30 excess clause,” The Australian Financial Review, June 10, 1977, p. 3.
  79. The naked emperor and the PM,” The Australian Financial Review, September 9, 1977, p. 3.
  80. Bert Kelly on Political Football — “The sporting camel in the tent of the taxpayer,” The Australian Financial Review, September 16, 1977, p. 3.
  81. Only blind greed demands both equality and prosperity — “That sod in the Rolls smoking a big cigar …,” The Australian Financial Review, November 4, 1977, p. 3.
  82. How to stand aside when it’s time to be counted,” The Australian Financial Review, November 11, 1977, p. 3.
  83. Undigested morsels in Fraser spew — “… and then you can use those lovely long words,” The Australian Financial Review, November 18, 1977, p. 3.
  84. How the Modest Member went back to being a Modest Farmer — “It’s back to the tractor,” The Australian Financial Review, December 16, 1977, p. 3.
  85. My pearls of wisdom were dull beyond belief,” The Australian Financial Review, December 23, 1977, p. 3.
  86. Should facts stand in the way of a good story?,” The Australian Financial Review, January 20, 1978, p. 3. On Whitlam’s July 1973 25% across the board tariff cut.
  87. Trade wars can easily lead to real wars,” The Australian Financial Review, February 3, 1978, p. 3.
  88. Eccles returns to haunt us — “Farmers cowed by tariffs fallout,” The Australian Financial Review, February 10, 1978, p. 3.
  89. Show us how we can twist our MP’s ear …,” The Australian Financial Review, February 17, 1978, p. 3.
  90. How to impress your MP — ambush him,” The Australian Financial Review, February 24, 1978, p. 3.
  91. Don’t feel sorry for him — hang on to his ear,” The Australian Financial Review, March 10, 1978, p. 3.
  92. How a well meaning Govt can be so stupid,” The Australian Financial Review, March 17, 1978, p. 3. Excerpt: “This is where Eccles and Fred disgraced themselves. Fred said there could only be one explanation of the Government’s reprehensible tariff behaviour and that was that the captains of secondary industry must be making generous contributions to party funds.”
  93. Can government kiss it better? — “When I buy cattle, why does Fred start to sell?,” The Australian Financial Review, March 31, 1978, p. 3.
  94. Malcolm Fraser stood tall on the shoulders of the downtrodden — “How a chance to boost our exports goes up in smoke,” The Australian Financial Review, April 21, 1978, p. 3.
  95. Being loved by all is not always a good thing,” The Australian Financial Review, June 23, 1978, p. 3. On Aborigines, welfare and guilt.
  96. Bert Kelly’s empowering feminism — “‘You must get rid of that wretched law, dear,'” The Australian Financial Review, July 7, 1978, p. 3.
  97. Ludwig von Mises on page 3 of AFR — “The language of power,” The Australian Financial Review, September 8, 1978, p. 3.
  98. Why leading businessmen carry black briefcases,” The Australian Financial Review, September 29, 1978, p. 3. Bert Kelly at his best, on the fact that big business is often against free-markets.
  99. Mavis wants the Modest Member to dedicate his book to her — “A rather crude man got stuck into me at the discussion,” The Australian Financial Review, October 6, 1978, p. 3.
  100. He’d soon have his feet in a bucket of champagne,” The Australian Financial Review, November 17, 1978, p. 3. Excerpt: “Politicians should have burnt on their breasts or on some broader part of their anatomy, the message that any servant of the government who can correctly foretell the supply and demand situation for any mineral for even one year ahead is not for long working for the government; he is shortly sitting in the south of France with his feet in a bucket of champagne.”
  101. I like my kind acts to get a mention in the press,” The Australian Financial Review, January 19, 1979, p. 3.
  102. Know your proper place if you want the quiet life,” The Australian Financial Review, February 2, 1979, p. 3.
  103. That welfare State tiger may eat us in the end,” The Australian Financial Review, July 13, 1979. p. 3.
  104. Soft hearted foolish people blinded by their tears,” The Australian Financial Review, August 3, 1979, p. 11.
  105. Mavis writes! — “Anniversary thought — and offer,” The Australian Financial Review, August 17, 1979, pp. 11, 14.
  106. Successful government intervention can [sic] occur — “Successful government intervention can occur,” The Australian Financial Review, August 24, 1979, p. 11.
  107. Country Party policies may not help farmers but do save seats,” The Australian Financial Review, September 7, 1979, p. 11.
  108. Speech only for public — “The C’wealth milks the cow but the State gets the cream,” The Australian Financial Review, September 14, 1979, p. 11.
  109. Don’t confuse plucking heart strings with plucking harp strings — “Economic understanding will triumph in the end,” The Australian Financial Review, October 5, 1979, p. 11.
  110. Government intervention and advice can be harmful, even when right, even for those it tries to help —  “An election must be looming!,” Stock and Land, November 29, 1979, p. 15. I credited that edition because the AFR version was a bit garbled at “Planting compassion on the Apple Isle,” The Australian Financial Review, November 30, 1979, p. 11.
  111. Bert Kelly on the importance of exchange rate movements — “The importance of easing the fear and pain of change,” The Australian Financial Review, February 29, 1980, p. 11.
  112. Bert Kelly on the importance of exchange rate movements — “What to do when market forces control exchange rate,” The Australian Financial Review, March 7, 1980, p. 11.
  113. Is Anthony ignorant or indifferent on tariffs?,” The Australian Financial Review, May 9, 1980, p. 11.
  114. The following eight items are on feather beds and part of the one series. We collated them at http://economics.org.au/2014/12/1980-bert-kelly-feather-bed-series/. “How many does it take to crowd a feather bed?,” The Australian Financial Review, June 6, 1980, p. 7.
  115. “Once on a feather bed, what to do next?,” The Australian Financial Review, June 13, 1980, p. 9.
  116. “Feather beds are comfortable if the mob is kept off them,” The Australian Financial Review, June 20, 1980, p. 13. On the Canberra taxi racket.
  117. “Conference lines take to plush waterbeds,” The Australian Financial Review, June 27, 1980, p. 13.
  118. “Shipping feather bed attracts large crew,” The Australian Financial Review, July 4, 1980, p. 13.
  119. “Feather beds take to the air,” Stock and Land, June 19, 1980, p. 13. On the two-airline policy.
  120. “Consumers find feather beds a bit hard!,” Stock and Land, June 26, 1980, p. 13.
  121. “Yes … the Wheat Board has a feather bed, too!,” Stock and Land, July 3, 1980, p. 12 and p. 14.
  122. Announcements in The Bulletin of Bert Kelly writing for them — “The Modest Farmer joins us,” The Bulletin, November 4, 1980, p. 20, and, “How The Modest Member came to be,” The Bulletin, November 11, 1980, p. 155, in a section on the same page as his first column in The Bulletin, which was titled “Boring it up the bastards from the bush” and was republished under a different title and a different date in Kelly’s Economics Made Easy. It is on Economics.org.au here. His final column in The Australian Financial Review was “Why should Mavis want me to learn to draw?,” October 17, 1980, p. 17, it included a short note from the editor.
  123. Perish the thawed! — “Cold comfort on a return trip,” The Bulletin, December 23/30, 1980, p. 68.
  124. Animal lib the new scourge of the bush,” The Bulletin, January 13, 1981, p. 91.
  125. Repeal economic laws, force people to buy new cars and enforce tariffs against overseas tennis players — “Protections that nobody needs,” The Bulletin, January 20, 1981, p. 107.
  126. Great ‘freedom of choice’ mystery,” The Bulletin, February 10, 1981, p. 91.
  127. Small government’s growth problem,” The Bulletin, February 17, 1981, p. 123.
  128. Even if lucky, we needn’t be stupid,” The Bulletin, March 17, 1981, p. 121. “About two years ago I was appointed chairman of a committee to advise State and Federal governments how to clean up the meat inspection mess. Our report was signed early in 1980 and because nothing seems to be happening I think I should drag the subject out into the open so that everyone can have a good look at it and see what a ripe old mess we have made of it.”
  129. Enough to drive you to drink,” The Bulletin, March 24, 1981, p. 107.
  130. The Association for the Prevention of Cruelty to Krill — “Are whales cruel to kill krill?” The Bulletin, April 7, 1981, p. 108.
  131. Transports of delay,” The Bulletin, April 14, 1981, p. 108.
  132. Feather beds too friendly,” The Bulletin, April 21, 1981, p. 142.
  133. It’s all a matter of principle,” The Bulletin, May 5, 1981, p. 118.
  134. The Playford charade is out of date,” The Bulletin, June 2, 1981, p. 102. On State Premiers pretending they don’t want Federal Parliament to do their dirty work.
  135. Time to stir some sleeping giants,” The Bulletin, July 14, 1981, p. 115.
  136. Tariff winds now blowing favourably,” The Bulletin, August 11, 1981, p. 100.
  137. Against guidance by government — “Telling the country where NOT to go,” The Bulletin, September 15, 1981, p. 115.
  138. A sordid use of scare tactics,” The Bulletin, September 22, 1981, p. 123.
  139. A socialist in Liberal clothing,” The Bulletin, October 6, 1981, p. 94.
  140. Never ask the government to help — “Blooming hand-outs in the desert,” The Bulletin, December 22/29, 1981, p. 102.
  141. A case for ministerial inertia,” The Bulletin, January 12, 1982, p. 89.
  142. Why politicians don’t like the truth,” The Bulletin, January 19, 1982, p. 104.
  143. Hurrah for the Gang of Five,” The Bulletin, February 23, 1982, p. 102.
  144. Parliament a place for pragmatists,” The Bulletin, March 9, 1982, p. 107.  He describes the Liberal Party philosophy thus: “We just have to govern Australia badly for fear that Labor might govern us worse.”
  145. Tariffs get the fork-tongue treatment,” The Bulletin, August 10, 1982, p. 108. The Australian Meat Industry Royal Commission unamused.
  146. Better to be popular than right,” The Bulletin, October 12, 1982, p. 150.
  147. Geriatric companies without a minder,” The Bulletin, October 19, 1982, p. 166.
  148. Welfare State Destroys Society — “Problems of a pressure-packed society,” The Bulletin, October 26, 1982, p. 138.
  149. Watchdog barking up the wrong tree,” The Bulletin, November 2, 1982, p. 115. Excerpt: “Ford … seems to spend more time bending its knees than its back.”
  150. Taking Canberra for a ride,” The Bulletin, November 9, 1982, p. 136. On the taxi racket.
  151. Nixon’s puzzling profession of faith,” The Bulletin, November 16, 1982, p. 139.
  152. Clyde Cameron’s weak ways with wise words — “Insider’s view a mixed blessing,” The Bulletin, November 23, 1982, p. 139.
  153. Thoughts on a verse about Balfour,” The Bulletin, November 30, 1982, p. 136.
  154. Why flaunt what others flout? — “The problems of profit prophets,” The Bulletin, December 7, 1982, p. 122. Excerpt: “I am talking about natural laws and Eccles is talking about economic laws. Both tell us what will inevitably happen whether we talk about them or not.”
  155. A free marketeer wary of free trade,” The Bulletin, December 14, 1982, p. 123. Excerpt: “I am getting the impression that [Neil Walford of Repco] is getting just a little bit confused. Or is it me?”
  156. Ominous dark clouds are gathering,” The Bulletin, January 4, 1983, p. 84. On tariffs and war.
  157. Tariff-cut nonsense lives on,” The Bulletin, January 18, 1983, p. 83. On Whitlam’s July 1973 25% across the board tariff cut.
  158. Bert Kelly asks, “How can you believe in free enterprise and government intervention at the same time?” — “A drug on the free market,” The Bulletin, February 15, 1983, p. 99.
  159. Bert Kelly Wants to Secede — “Tassie should cut the painter,” The Bulletin, March 8, 1983, p. 100. Tasmania could be the next Singapore or Hong Kong.
  160. Cunning meets wisdom — “Less is the best government,” The Bulletin, March 29, 1983, p. 122.
  161. Bert Kelly pep talk to politicians — “High and low tide in Canberra,” The Bulletin, April 5, 1983, p. 139.
  162. “Better to lose a poll than morality,” The Bulletin, April 12, 1983, p. 111. Included in link immediately above.
  163. Having your cake and eating it,” The Bulletin, April 26, 1983, p. 108.
  164. Who needs literary licence?,” The Bulletin, May 31, 1983, p. 118. Kelly says Neville Kennard is “splendid” and “speaks my language.”
  165. Government intervention = Agony postponed but death brought nearer — “Anthony to the rescue,” The Bulletin, June 7, 1983, p. 123.
  166. Bert Kelly: “I must take some of the blame” — “Fraser’s foolish seven-year feast,” The Bulletin, June 28, 1983, p. 118.
  167. A touch of Fred’s anarchy,” The Bulletin, July 19, 1983, p. 118. Kelly calls Kennard “brave” and “pigheaded.”
  168. Salvation in a sea of scales,” The Bulletin, August 2, 1983, p. 88.
  169. Unscrambling the egg,” The Bulletin, August 9, 1983, p. 110.
  170. The goose that laid the golden egg,” The Bulletin, August 16, 1983, p. 118.
  171. Running to water on wages,” The Bulletin, August 23, 1983, p. 110.
  172. Centralising confrontation,” The Bulletin, August 30, 1983, p. 96.
  173. Shaking up the feather bed,” The Bulletin, September 6, 1983, p. 120.
  174. Government Intervention vs Government Interference — “Breaking down barriers,” The Bulletin, September 13, 1983, p. 124.
  175. Bert Kelly Destroys the Freeloading Justifies Government Argument — “A thought to make thin blood run cold,” The Bulletin, September 27, 1983, p. 142.
  176. Bert Kelly: “I did not try often or hard enough” — “The problems of stabilisation schemes,” The Bulletin, December 13, 1983, p. 112.
  177. Ken Baxter, “The Gospel according to Bert,” The Bulletin, December 27, 1983 / January 3, 1984, p. 84.
  178. Proud patriotic parasites — “A lean time all round,” The Bulletin, January 10, 1984, p. 83.
  179. Bert Kelly’s 1984 two-article quote-collection on Aboriginal policies — “A new look at Aboriginal policies,” The Bulletin, February 21, 1984, p. 99; and “Focus on ‘the good old ways’,” The Bulletin, February 28, 1984, p. 90.
  180. A look at life without tariffs,” The Bulletin, March 27, 1984, p. 116.
  181. Bert Kelly “lacked … guts and wisdom” — “Let’s have a quota of principles,” The Bulletin, April 3, 1984, 106.
  182. The high cost of protection,” The Bulletin, April 24, 1984, p. 144.
  183. Generosity creates problems,” The Bulletin, May 1, 1984, p. 128. On the Canberra taxi racket.
  184. Case for ministers staying home,” The Bulletin, May 8, 1984, p. 120.
  185. Why costs can’t be guaranteed,” The Bulletin, May 15, 1984, p. 118.
  186. A tottering monument to intervention,” The Bulletin, June 19, 1984, p. 136. On the car industry and his prolific commentary on it.
  187. Hitting out with a halo,” The Bulletin, July 24, 1984, p. 150. On Hugh Morgan and Aborigines.
  188. Intervention is egg-headedness,” The Bulletin, July 31, 1984, p. 134.
  189. Egging on the substitutes,” The Bulletin, August 7, 1984, p. 144.
  190. The unusual self-evident simplicity of the Modest Members Society — “What the market will bear,” The Bulletin, August 14, 1984, p. 124.
  191. The icing on the economic cake — “Sugar — sweet and sour,” The Bulletin, August 21, 1984, p. 135.
  192. The icing on the economic cake — “Sugar not so sweet,” The Bulletin, August 28, 1984, p. 136.
  193. Paying farmers not to grow crops will save on subsidies, revenge tariffs, etc — “Dreams up in smoke,” The Bulletin, September 11, 1984, p. 146.
  194. The icing on the economic cake — “A proper way to behave,” The Bulletin, September 18, 1984, p. 150.
  195. Crying in the wilderness — “Back to the wilderness,” The Bulletin, September 25, 1984, p. 120.
  196. From Shann to Stone,” The Bulletin, October 2, 1984, p. 94.
  197. A sojourn in the real world,” The Bulletin, October 16, 1984, p. 119.
  198. The tariff wind swings,” The Bulletin, October 23, 1984, p. 144.
  199. Bigger Cake = Bigger Slices — “Mavis to the rescue,” The Bulletin, November 6, 1984, p. 140.
  200. Industrial Relations Club shovellers — “A bigger cake but for Bruce,” The Bulletin, October 30, 1984, p. 121.
  201. Ivory tower needs thumping,” The Bulletin, December 11, 1984, p. 135.
  202. Thoughts on how to kill dinosaurs,” The Bulletin, December 25, 1984 / January 1, 1985, p. 89.
  203. Let’s try the chill winds,” The Bulletin, January 22, 1985, p. 97.
  204. Bert Kelly says end compulsory voting to stop donkey vote — “How to stop the donkey vote,” The Bulletin, February 12, 1985, p. 93.
  205. Industrial relations dinosaur, Bruce, chews his cud — “Strike out the picketers,” The Bulletin, February 19, 1985, p. 93.
  206. Hooray for “firmly entrenched”! — “Back to ‘dog and stick’ farming,” The Bulletin, March 5, 1985, p. 90.
  207. Unholy state of taxation,” The Bulletin, March 19, 1985, p. 98. Excerpt: “When I die, I hope people will remember me by the proverb: ‘You can always tell a man who is dining out on an expense account by the enthusiasm with which he summons the waiter.'” Another excerpt: “I flatly refuse to write about different ways of raising more tax money.”
  208. Respect your dinosaurs — “The dinosaurs progress,” The Bulletin, March 26, 1985, p. 140.
  209. What if something is “deeply ingrained” yet harmful? — “Eccles lifts the tone of the argument,” The Bulletin, April 2, 1985, p. 80.
  210. You’re lucky if you escape being helped by government — “Technique good, but the marketing …,” The Bulletin, April 16, 1985, p. 102.
  211. Bert Kelly in 1985 on cars yet again — “Don’t ask the Govt. to drive industry,” Stock and Land, May 2, 1985, p. 18.
  212. Bert Kelly responds to claims he is arrogant and uncredentialed — “Doing what comes naturally,” The Australian, July 1, 1985, p. 11.
  213. Knocking the stuffing out of feather beds,” The Australian, July 8, 1985, p. 7.
  214. Tiny note on Bert Kelly’s column in The Bulletin in 1985 — “The Modest Farmer,” The Bulletin, July 23, 1985, p. 98, in the anonymous “Wildcat” section.
  215. Politicians get undeserved praise, why not undeserved blame too? — “Poor Bruce doesn’t want to be left holding the baby,” The Australian, August 5, 1985, p. 9.
  216. A posse goes after Anthony,” The Australian, October 7, 1985, p. 7.
  217. “Panting in vain for tariff sanity,” The Australian, October 14, 1985, p. 9 — that version of the article has a jumbled and truncated ending, so I instead used the text from the article’s publication in a Victorian rural newspaper where it appeared under the title, “Sorry Doug, subsidies are not the answer, Stock and Land, October 17, 1985, p. 19.
  218. Spectre of the bad old days has Eccles in a flap,” The Australian, October 21, 1985, p. 9.
  219. How a sweet cop turned an industry sour,” The Australian, February 25, 1986, p. 9.
  220. The feather bed on rails sure runs against the grain,” The Australian, June 30, 1986, p. 11.
  221. Recipe for disaster: Freeze! — “Pressure groups are indeed the foes of progress,” The Australian, July 14, 1986, p. 7.
  222. Recipe for government intervention: Gather winners and scatter losers — “How the strident pressure groups beggar everybody else,” The Australian, July 21, 1986, p. 9.
  223. Recipe for industry destruction: Blanket market signals — “How lobbies can do damage to their own causes,” The Australian, July 28, 1986, p. 9.
  224. On Alf Rattigan’s book Industry Assistance: The Inside Story — “Adam Smith’s soothing words,” The Australian, August 11, 1986, p. 11.
  225. On Alf Rattigan’s book Industry Assistance: The Inside Story — “Turning tariff somersaults,” The Australian, August 18, 1986, p. 11.
  226. On Alf Rattigan’s book Industry Assistance: The Inside Story — “How Rattigan took on the protectionists,” The Australian, August 25, 1986, p. 11.
  227. Chicken-hearted feathered friends strange bedfellows on a feather bed? — “The politics of protection,” The Australian, November 10, 1986, p. 17.
  228. Chicken-hearted feathered friends strange bedfellows on a feather bed? — “Bitter experience and learning economic laws,” The Australian, November 17, 1986, p. 9.
  229. Chicken-hearted feathered friends strange bedfellows on a feather bed? — “Same old song from the TCF,” The Australian, November 24, 1986, p. 7.
  230. The Libido for the Miserable — “An answer to island woes,” The Australian, January 12, 1987, p. 7.
  231. Modest column #898 — “When the Member first went on show,” Queensland Graingrower’s “Family Living” lift-out magazine, May 27, 1987, p. 2.

(e.) Columns republished in 1982 in Economics Made Easy

  1. Foreword by Sir Roderick Carnegie
  2. Bert Kelly on “this land of limitless resources” and “great open spaces” — “Critics leave a politician speechless,” The Australian Financial Review, January 16, 1970, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 9-10, as “Limited Resources (1).”
  3. Growing bananas at the South Pole — “The ‘growth’ tack — real or hot-house?,” The Australian Financial Review, January 30, 1970, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 153-54, as “Growth (1).”
  4. Cold water on government-instigated irrigation schemes — “More cold water on irrigation,” The Australian Financial Review, March 20, 1970, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 14-16, as “Irrigation.”
  5. Hooray for Ord River Dam! — “Getting the Ord River into the hit parade,” The Australian Financial Review, March 26, 1970, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 16-17, as “The Ord Dam.”
  6. Bert Kelly on the 2011 Budget and Australia’s Pathetic Journalists and Politicians — “Incentive slices for a bigger cake?,” The Australian Financial Review, May 8, 1970, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 138-40, as “Equality (1).”
  7. Spending your Money — “Whose hand is in the honeypot?,” The Australian Financial Review, June 19, 1970, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 129-31, as “Spending your Money.”
  8. Hooray for Northern Development! — “The search for instant popularity,” The Australian Financial Review, June 26, 1970, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 12-14, as “Northern Development.”
  9. Traditional Wheat Farming is Our Birthright and Heritage and Must be Protected! — “Subsidising prosperity on the small farm,” The Australian Financial Review, August 14, 1970, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 27-29, as “Small Farmers (1).”
  10. Bert Kelly gets his head around big-headed bird-brained politics — “How to win votes from birds of passage,” The Australian Financial Review, October 2, 1970, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 21-23, as “Exporting Birds.”
  11. Decentralisation — or how to alienate both city and country,” The Australian Financial Review, October 30, 1970, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 31-33, as “Decentralisation.”
  12. Eccles keeps our nose hard down on the tariff grindstone — “Why we help but don’t buy from cheap labour lands,” The Australian Financial Review, December 11, 1970, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 115-17, as “Cheap Labour (1).”
  13. Bert Kelly Destroys the Infant Industry Argument — “Can we still afford a foster mother for the steel industry?,” The Australian Financial Review, December 31, 1970, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 100-02, as “Iron and Steel (1).”
  14. Tariffs: when to wean infant BHP?,” The Australian Financial Review, March 5, 1971, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 62-63, as “Tariffs to keep down Prices.”
  15. Inflation breeds moral decay,” The Australian Financial Review, March 12, 1971, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 133-34, as “Inflation.”
  16. Bert Kelly on pensions — “Do Australian pensioners get too little?,” The Australian Financial Review, April 8, 1971, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 134-36, as “Welfare State (1).”
  17. Who envies equality? — “Equality is all very well but it won’t help India,” The Australian Financial Review, April 16, 1971, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 140-42, as “Equality (2).”
  18. Bert Kelly on Small Farmers — “Horse sense about the pony trap,” The Australian Financial Review, May 21, 1971, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 29-31, as “Small Farmers (2).”
  19. An Idiot’s Guide to Interventionism — “Beware of silk purses and the sow,” The Australian Financial Review, June 18, 1971, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 5-7, as “Supply and Demand (1).” The statist bible.
  20. Bert Kelly on the theory of constant shares and the Fabian Society — “Strikes can mean lower wages,” The Australian Financial Review, August 27, 1971, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 131-33, as “Productivity.”
  21. “Don’t you believe in protecting us against imports from cheap labour countries?” — “A punch in the eye for a protectionist?,” The Australian Financial Review, October 8, 1971, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 117-19, as “Cheap Labour (2).”
  22. Has Santa socked it to car makers?,” The Australian Financial Review, December 24, 1971, p. 3. The AFR version is garbled. A better version, which we used, is in Economics Made Easy, pp. 79-81, as “Motor Cars (1),” dated 31 December 1971.
  23. Helping the farmers help themselves,” The Australian Financial Review, February 25, 1972, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 18-19, as “Droughts.”
  24. It’s nonsense to snare the dumping hare,” The Australian Financial Review, March 24, 1972, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 75-76, as “Dumping Duties.”
  25. What the MP could say to the Bishop,” The Australian Financial Review, May 12, 1972, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 158-60, as “Trouble with Bishops.”
  26. If you support State Quotas, where will your logic take you? — “Dividing the wheat from the chaff …,” The Australian Financial Review, March 2, 1973, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 33-35, as “State Quotas.”
  27. Fred’s Feeling: Counterpatriotic country contrarian — “Farmer Fred takes it all in his stride,” The Australian Financial Review, March 9, 1973, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 25-27, as “Going Against the Tide.”
  28. Growth — malignant or benign?,” The Australian Financial Review, July 6, 1973, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 154-56, as “Growth (2).”
  29. Can price control really work?,” The Australian Financial Review, October 12, 1973, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 156-58, as “Wages and Income Policy.”
  30. About time the protection racket ended,” The Australian Financial Review, February 8, 1974, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 112-14, as “Electrical Appliances.”
  31. Bert Kelly on Disaster Relief — “‘Calamity Jane’ role for Mavis,” The Australian Financial Review, February 22, 1974, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 19-21, as “Disaster Relief.”
  32. Bert Kelly on Import Quotas — “Thought was too much for the old sod,” The Australian Financial Review, January 3, 1975, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 71-72, as “Import Quotas (1).”
  33. Bert Kelly on Free Enterprise — “Tell us what to do next, they bleat,” The Australian Financial Review, January 17, 1975, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 149-51, as “Free Enterprise (1).”
  34. “Free enterprise like premarital chastity,” The Australian Financial Review, June 4, 1976, p. 6. Economics Made Easy, pp. 151-53, as “Free Enterprise (2)” under the date June 4, 1975. I included both “Free Enterprise (1)” and “Free Enterprise (2)” in the link immediately above.
  35. I, for one, still support the tariff cut,” The Australian Financial Review, July 4, 1975, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 58-59, as “Twenty-five per cent Tariff Cut.” On Whitlam’s July 1973 25% across the board tariff cut.
  36. People not Politics,” October 10, 1975. Economics Made Easy, pp. 127-29.
  37. Sound economics calls for quiet from government — “The accent is on the indicative,” The Australian Financial Review, April 23, 1976, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 142-43, as “Indicative Planning.” If you favour smaller government, favour quieter government too.
  38. You gets your tariff, you pays a price,” The Australian Financial Review, July 16, 1976, p. 4. Economics Made Easy, pp. 42-44, as “Tariffs paid by Exporters (1).” Great intro to tariffs.
  39. Bert Kelly Untangles Tariff Torment — “Foster mothering BHP beef bull,” The Australian Financial Review, August 20, 1976, p. 6. Economics Made Easy, pp. 102-04, as “Iron and Steel (2).”
  40. Bert Kelly Destroys the Side Benefits Argument for Government — “You can lead a horse to water, but …,” The Australian Financial Review, September 17, 1976, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 108-10, as “Shipbuilding (2).”
  41. Tariffs Create Unemployment — “The price for protection has to be paid,” The Australian Financial Review, September 24, 1976, p. 6. Economics Made Easy, pp. 51-53, as “Tariffs and Employment (1).” “Tariffs and Employment (2)” is here.
  42. Tariffs — no such thing as a free feed,” The Australian Financial Review, November 12, 1976, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 44-46, as “Tariffs paid by Exporters (2).”
  43. Mavis trying to buy a hand loom,” The Australian Financial Review, March 4, 1977, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 145-47, as “Change.”
  44. Government wiser than Magna Carta — “A licence to print a quota of money,” The Australian Financial Review, May 6, 1977, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 72-74, as “Import Quotas (2).”
  45. We may not like it, but times change,” The Australian Financial Review, August 12, 1977, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 46-47, as “The Cost of Protection.”
  46. Tariffs are hilariously counterproductive — “If we were English we’d laugh at ourselves,” The Australian Financial Review, August 19, 1977, p. 9. Economics Made Easy, pp. 91-93, as “Textiles (2).”
  47. How do we cure our tariff disease?,” The Australian Financial Review, August 26, 1977, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 93-95, as “Textiles (3),” under the date June 24, 1977.
  48. Bert Kelly, Hayek and Mencken on the virtues of farmers — “So Fred and I hung up our haloes on a nail,” The Australian Financial Review, January 13, 1978, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 3-5, as “The Virtue of Farmers.” The opening column of Economics Made Easy!
  49. A worm’s eye view — “A mixed-up toad knows tariffs are a load,” The Australian Financial Review, January 27, 1978, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 48-49, as “Back to the Farm.”
  50. The time for being nice to our MPs has gone …,” The Australian Financial Review, March 3, 1978, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 53-55, as “Tariffs and Employment (2).”
  51. Our great open spaces … an empty blessing,” The Australian Financial Review, May 19, 1978, p. 3. Reprinted minus the first three paragraphs in Economics Made Easy, pp. 10-12, as “Limited Resources (2).”
  52. Eccles’ thin blood ran cold as the PM spoke,” The Australian Financial Review, May 26, 1978, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 56-57, as “Tariffs and Secondary Industry.”
  53. Bert Kelly on the Political Process — The Hon. C. R. “Bert” Kelly, One More Nail (Adelaide: Brolga Books, 1978), “Introduction,” pp. xi-xiii; also republished in Economics Made Easy, pp. 95-98, as “Textiles (4)”; first published by A Modest Farmer as, “High and dry for the King and I,” The Australian Financial Review, June 16, 1978, p. 3.
  54. If tariffs are opposed here then why not there? — “The writing is on the tariff wall,” The Australian Financial Review, August 18, 1978, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 85-87, as “Motor Cars (4).”
  55. Government Intervention — “The weak must die so the strong can grow,” The Australian Financial Review, September 15, 1978, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 144-45, as “Government Intervention.”
  56. Getting off the welfare tiger could be dangerous,” The Australian Financial Review, December 15, 1978, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 136-38, as “Welfare State (2).”
  57. Unbuckling the hobbles on the motor industry,” The Australian Financial Review, February 16, 1979, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 87-89, as “Motor Cars (5).”
  58. How Bert Kelly repays a free feed — “Pointing a Gunn at shipping conferences,” The Australian Financial Review, March 9, 1979, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 168-70, as “Outlook Conference.”
  59. Anti-freedom pro-tobacco industry lobby harmed Australia — “Can a lowly sheep farmer afford to grow tobacco?,” The Australian Financial Review, March 16, 1979, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 35-36, as “Tobacco.”
  60. Bert Kelly resorts to prayer —  “You can lose more than gain through protection,” The Australian Financial Review, April 12, 1979, p. 3. Economics Made Easy, pp. 104-06, as “Iron and Steel (3).”
  61. Should it be compulsory to buy footwear and clothing?,” The Australian Financial Review, October 12, 1979, p. 11. Economics Made Easy, pp. 98-100, as “Textiles (5).”
  62. Bert Kelly on political speech writers — “Political songwriters adept at changing the lyrics,” The Australian Financial Review, October 19, 1979, p. 11. Economics Made Easy, pp. 65-67, as “Tariffs and the P.M.”
  63. The Vale of Popularity and the Protection Procession — “Protectionist parade to the Vale of Popularity,” The Australian Financial Review, November 16, 1979, p. 11. Economics Made Easy, pp. 183-85, as “The Protection Procession.”
  64. Petrol for Farmers— “Problems in hopping on cheap fuel bandwaggon,” The Australian Financial Review, November 23, 1979, p. 11. Economics Made Easy, pp. 38-40, as “Petrol for Farmers.”
  65. The ruthless aspect of the law of supply and demand,” The Australian Financial Review, December 7, 1979, p. 11. Economics Made Easy, pp. 147-49, as “Supply and Demand.” Either obey the law of supply and demand or repeal it, but whatever you do, don’t ignore it.
  66. Handouts can buy salvation more easily than idolatry,” The Australian Financial Review, January 11, 1980, p. 5. Economics Made Easy, pp. 215-17, as “Mr Hartley (a).”
  67. Learning to thunder like Elijah in the wilderness,” The Australian Financial Review, January 18, 1980, p. 9. Economics Made Easy, pp. 217-19, as “Mr Hartley (b).”
  68. Beware of crocodiles (and others) at textile meetings,” The Australian Financial Review, January 25, 1980, p. 11. Economics Made Easy, pp. 219-21, as “Mr Hartley (c).”
  69. Wanted: textile spokesman, no understanding of economics necessary,” The Australian Financial Review, February 1, 1980, p. 11. Economics Made Easy, pp. 221-23, as “Mr Hartley (d).”
  70. Politics 101: Pay Lip Service to Capitalism and Shoot the Messenger — “If we do tamper with tariffs, let’s do it well,” The Australian Financial Review, March 28, 1980, p. 13. Economics Made Easy, pp. 185-87, as “Government Intervention.”
  71. Bert Kelly vs Bert Kelly vs Bert Kelly — “Tax revolt evades the notice of Mr Howard,” The Australian Financial Review, April 11, 1980, p. 13. Economics Made Easy, pp. 236-38, as “Canberra School (a),” dated March 11, 1980.
  72. Bert Kelly vs Bert Kelly vs Bert Kelly — “Who among us can cast the first gall stone?,” The Australian Financial Review, April 18, 1980, p. 13. Economics Made Easy, pp. 238-40, as “Canberra School (b),” dated March 18, 1980.
  73. Bert Kelly vs Bert Kelly vs Bert Kelly — “Income tax encourages ‘avoision’ schemes,” The Australian Financial Review, April 24, 1980, p. 13. Economics Made Easy, pp. 240-42, as “Canberra School (c),” dated March 25, 1980.
  74. Bert Kelly vs Bert Kelly vs Bert Kelly — “Born again on the issue of death duties,” The Australian Financial Review, May 2, 1980, p. 13. Economics Made Easy, pp. 242-44, as “Canberra School (d),” dated May 2, 1980.
  75. Bert kelly makes politicians eat their own words on tariffs, then says, “We cannot be blamed for treating the statements of our statesmen with cynical contempt” — “Politicians’ statements worthy only of contempt,” The Australian Financial Review, August 29, 1980, p. 13; …
  76. … and “A many splendoured catalogue of meaningless statements,” The Australian Financial Review, September 5, 1980, p. 13. Economics Made Easy, pp. 223-25, as “After the Cabinet Decision (a)”; and pp. 225-27, as “After the Cabinet Decision (b).”
  77. Bert Kelly brilliantly defends “theoretical academics” — “Politicians become bully boys over IAC report,” The Australian Financial Review, September 12, 1980, p. 13. Economics Made Easy, pp. 228-30, as “Defence of I.A.C.”
  78. Cartoons of protected industry, the welfare teat and the nanny state — “Why should Mavis want me to learn to draw?,” The Australian Financial Review, October 17, 1980, p. 17. Economics Made Easy, pp. 187-91, as “Two Cartoons.”
  79. Bert Kelly, Bastard or Simple Sod? — “Boring it up the bastards from the bush,” The Bulletin, November 11, 1980, p. 155. Economics Made Easy, pp. 244-46, as “Dr Stretton,” dated 22 October 1980.
  80. The feather bed becomes crowded,” The Bulletin, March 31, 1981, p. 123. Economics Made Easy, pp. 198-200, as “Feather Beds.”
  81. Striped trousers at the ready,” The Bulletin, June 16, 1981, p. 123. Economics Made Easy, pp. 191-93, as “Modest Members Association.”
  82. Don’t listen to economists! — “Beware the popular economist,” The Bulletin, June 30, 1981, p. 131. Economics Made Easy, pp. 233-35, as “Money Supply and Cigarettes.”
  83. Running with hares can be exhausting,” The Bulletin, July 28, 1981, p. 115. Economics Made Easy, pp. 193-96, as “Mr Anthony.”
  84. A charabanc called protection,” The Bulletin, August 25, 1981, p. 104. Economics Made Easy, pp. 200-03, as “Charabanc (a).”
  85. Taken for a ride — to nowhere,” The Bulletin, September 1, 1981, p. 147. Economics Made Easy, pp. 203-06, as “Charabanc (b).”
  86. Down hill, in circles, all the way,” The Bulletin, September 8, 1981, p. 114. Economics Made Easy, pp. 206-08, as “Charabanc (c).”
  87. Bad news for bearers of bad news,” The Bulletin, October 13, 1981, p. 180. Economics Made Easy, pp. 195-97, as “I.A.C. Treatment.”

(f.) Other Bert Kelly works and mentions

  1. Liberal Backbencher Hits Govt. Over Import Restrictions,” The Age, April 4, 1962, p. 6.
  2. S. W. Stephens, “Quiet Man Makes An Impact,” The Advertiser, May 14, 1966, p. 2.
  3. Bert Kelly, “Tariff Protection in Australia,” speech to the Finnish Chamber of Commerce, Sydney, December 4, 1970.
  4. Car components tariff protection under fire,” The Australian Financial Review, March 3, 1972, p. 5.
  5. 1976 ABC TV Monday Conference transcript featuring Bert Kelly
  6. Competition, Aussie-style: Who’s the bigger parasite? — Bert Kelly, “You pay millions to prop up workers,” The Australian, July 8, 1976, p. 9; and C. R. Kelly, “One-Sided,” The Australian, July 14, 1976, p. 8, as a letter to the editor.
  7. John Hurst, “Max Newton: Maverick in Exile,” Nation Review, July 21-27, 1977, p. 11 — “The only politician I ever had any time for was Bert Kelly, the Member for Wakefield, SA, who conducted a lone, thankless campaign in favour of low tariffs with no hope of preferment under Menzies.”
  8. Bert Kelly vs The Australian on tariffs in 1977 — C. R. Kelly, “‘I fear for the fate of the IAC’,” The Australian, September 2, 1977, p. 6, as a letter to the editor; and C. R. Kelly, “Protection is not the answer,” The Australian, December 23, 1977, p. 6, as a letter to the editor.
  9. Bert Kelly, “The silly image of our MPs,” The Advertiser, December 22, 1977, p. 4. Published two days later as “The politician and his image,” The Age, December 24, 1977, p. 10.
  10. Bert Kelly Question Time highlights — Bert Kelly, “Question timing,” The Advertiser, December 23, 1977, p. 4. Published three days later as “A time when the question’s the thing,” The Age, December 26, 1977, p. 7.
  11. Kenneth Graham, “The Modest Member must not give up,” The Bulletin, December 17, 1977, p. 112 — “He is one of those rare politicians who actually manages to see the importance of consistent, long-term policies over immediate party advantage.”
  12. Kenneth Graham, “Some sound advice from a modest farmer,” The Bulletin, December 12, 1978, p. 123.
  13. C.R. Kelly, “A Modest Farmer looks at the Problems of Structural Change,” Economic Papers, no. 59 (August, 1978), pp. 91-95.
  14. Sacred cow kicker into print,” The Bulletin, August 29, 1978, p. 93, in the “Intelligencer” column.
  15. Political No Man’s Land — Sir Roderick Carnegie, “Responsibilities,” a talk at Australian Institute of Management Victoria, August 6, 1979. Published as a pamphlet by Conzinc Riotinto of Australia Limited. Excerpt: “We have to learn the courage of such people as Bert Kelly, who, almost on his own, pursued his mission for long-term economic good sense over twenty years. Twenty years of criticism and ridicule by people in both trenches [left and right] whose major concern was next week or next year. Twenty years of critics who found his defence of a free market incompatible with their short term profits.”
  16. Maxwell Newton, “A ‘spy’ replies,” The Bulletin, December 16, 1980, p. 5, as a letter to the editor — “Bert Kelly was … a close and dear friend in those early days.”
  17. Bert Kelly after dinner speech transcript, “Agricultural Development and Tariffs,” for the 6th Annual Northern Development Seminar in Katherine, October 29, 1981.
  18. Government Fails Spectacularly — Bert Kelly, “Monarto … and why it went wrong,” The Bulletin, November 3, 1981, p. 44. This is the first and so far only article in The Bulletin by Bert Kelly that I have found that is not his Modest Farmer column.
  19. Robert Haupt, “This is the wall the Right built,” National Times on Sunday, September 7, 1986, p. 12  — “True, there has long been a free-market faction in the Liberal Party: for many years, its name was Bert Kelly. Kelly carried the standard against the trade-stifling policies of successive Liberal-Country Party governments, and he generally carried it alone. His party colleagues regarded him with amusement; his political career went nowhere.”
  20. Bert Kelly reviews The War Diaries of Weary Dunlop — Quadrant, May 1987, pp. 76-77.
  21. Bert Kelly reviews We Were There — Quadrant, November 1987, pp. 77-78.
  22. Bert Kelly, “Of Sugar Wells and Think-Tanks,” Quadrant, September 1991, pp. 51-53.
  23. Bert Kelly, “Bounties or Tariffs, Someone Pays,” IPA Review, Vol. 45 No. 4, 1992, p. 12.
  24. David Barnett, “Taking the Right’s road,” The Bulletin, July 12, 1988, pp. 32-35. — “Just as much as the valedictory dinner, the government’s structural adjustment committee of cabinet is a tribute to the Modest Member.”
  25. Viv Forbes, “Time to Butcher ‘Aussie Beef’,” Our Sacred Land & Other Essays (first published by Business Queensland and Common Sense in 1994), issue no. 102: “Three major Australian Meat exporters complained again in 1980, this time to Federal Police, about meat substitution (which by then included horse meat). Bert Kelly chaired an investigation which reported that abattoir managers were using gifts to induce meat inspectors to look the other way. Bert’s report was shelved …” For Bert Kelly on meat, see “Even if lucky, we needn’t be stupid,” The Bulletin, March 17, 1981, p. 121, which brings some of the report findings out into the open, and “Tariffs get the fork-tongue treatment,” The Bulletin, August 10, 1982, p. 108, where Bert Kelly tells of his appearance before Royal Commission on Meat Inspection.
  26. John Hyde, “Bert Kelly: the odd man out who’s now in,” The Weekend Australian, June 18-19, 1988, p. 22. Compare tone with following item. Discusses Kelly’s book Merrindie: A Family’s Farm.
  27. John Hyde, “Dries must resist giving up struggle as going gets tough,” The Weekend Australian, January 21-22, 1989, p. 24.
  28. John Hyde, “Reborn Liberals set the agenda,” The Weekend Australian, September 1-2, 1990, p. 20.
  29. John Hyde, “Why ideas people should club together,” The Weekend Australian, September 29-30, 1990, p. 20.
  30. Errol Simper, “Boring economics worth a smile,” The Australian, February 21, 1990, p. 2 — “Mr Cole, who believes a little more efficiency — micro-economic reform — could save us a collective $16 billion a year, is himself fond of telling Bert Kelly stories. Mr Kelly, a former South Australian federal Liberal MP, wrote a column entitled The Modest Member for many years and was one of politics’ most amusing raconteurs.”
  31. Robert Haupt, “Why no-one is nailing the Big Green Lie,” The Sydney Morning Herald, March 17, 1990, p. 6 — brilliant article by Haupt, very evocative of Bert Kelly.
  32. Bert Kelly, “The best featherbeds run on rails,” Australian Rural Times, March 29-April 4, 1990, p. 9.
  33. Bert Kelly, “Politics: it’s a very confusing business,” Australian Rural Times, August 2-7, 1990, p. 9.
  34. Ross Gittins Wins Bert Kelly Award — “Award for Ross Gittins,” The Sydney Morning Herald, March 15, 1991, p. 2; and Ross Gittins, “Why we must roll back the tyranny of distance,” The Sydney Morning Herald, May 23, 1990, p. 13.
  35. Bert Kelly, “A Modest Member rakes the embers,” The Australian Financial Review, March 21, 1991, p. 55.
  36. Bert Kelly on LSD — Bert Kelly, “Woolly laws of labour,” The Australian Financial Review, December 9, 1991, p. 15.
  37. Bert Kelly reflects on the Australian car industry in 1992 — “Government car plans going nowhere,” The Australian Financial Review, June 11, 1992, p. 15. Excerpt: “… farmers were too busy to worry about ideology, but we had learned the hard way that governments usually made a mess of business matters because they were more interested in being popular than right.”
  38. Bert Kelly wants reprinted Shann’s Economic History of Australia — “Reflections on a history of farming folly,” The Australian Financial Review, August 11, 1992, p. 15.

(g.) Dave’s Diary/Clarkson Says

  1. Perhaps being smart and insured isn’t all luck — “The Droolings of Dave,” The Adelaide Stock and Station Journal, March 21, 1945, p. 7.
  2. Bert Kelly yearns for Tim Flannery’s powers of prediction — The Adelaide Stock and Station Journal, April 11, 1945, p. 22.
  3. 1959 return of Dave’s Diary announcement — Adelaide Stock & Station Journal, January 28, 1959, p. 5. Excerpt: “It is many years since I wrote the last issue of Dave’s Diary, way back in 1946 it was. Many people have asked me why I stopped them but the reason was a simple one, I ran out of paper.”
  4. Catchy Tariff Circus Extravaganza — Adelaide Stock & Station Journal, March 2, 1960, pp. 52-53.
  5. To save Australian clothing industry women must all wear same uniform — Adelaide Stock & Station Journal, May 30, 1962, pp. 56-57.
  6. Bert Kelly’s empiricism is not kneejerk reaction kind — Adelaide Stock & Station Journal, March 27, 1963, pp. 14-15.
  7. Clarkson crowned Deputy Government Whip — Adelaide Stock & Station Journal, August 26, 1964, pp. 90-91.
  8. Vernon Report upholds Clarkson,” Adelaide Stock & Station Journal, September 29, 1965, p. 87.
  9. Why should dryland farmers subsidise irrigation farmers? — “We have had rain, but not enough!,” Adelaide Stock & Station Journal, March 30, 1966, p. 60.
  10. How much should government decrease incentive for independence from government? — “Governments love to be popular!,” Adelaide Stock & Station Journal, August 24, 1966, p. 83.
  11. Bert Kelly on ApathyStock Journal, February 22, 1967, p. 35.
  12. Bert Kelly in 1967 on “problems of government and things like that” — Stock Journal, July 20, 1967, p. 41.
  13. The last “Dave’s Diary” — Stock Journal, February 29, 1968, p. 14.
  14. Bert Kelly on market predictions — “Schemes fix market needs … no more,” Country Life, February 25-March 2, 1976, p. 32.
  15. Auto industry is in a straitjacket,” Country Life, April 14-20, 1976, p. 36.
  16. Looking after yourself is silly,” Country Life, June 16-22, 1976, p. 32.
  17. Bert Kelly masterpiece on drought, fire, flood and other natural disaster government relief schemes — “Insure one, insure the lot,” Country Life, June 23-29, 1976, p. 40.
  18. Bert Kelly to blame for soaring government healthcare costs — “This solution to Medibank ‘too simple’,” Country Life, August 25-31, 1976, p. 44.
  19. Government can take credit for our car industry mess,” Country Life, July 27, 1977, p. 48.
  20. Why our MP is no longer prone to a good sob story,” Country Life, August 3, 1977, p. 36.
  21. Car makers want the 4wd driven deeper into tariff bog,” Country Life, September, 14, 1977, p. 44.