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  1. Three items this week featuring Maxwell Newton (founding editor of The Australian and the daily AFR) at his fiercest: (1) “How to stop Labor running wild,” Jobson’s Investment Digest, January 22, 1973, pp. 2-4; (2) “What it’s like to meet Reg in the dark,” Jobson’s Investment Digest, May 12, 1972, pp. 2-4; and (3) “State aid and the privileged,” The Australian, October 21, 1964, p. 10.
  2. Bert Kelly, “Unholy state of taxation,” The Bulletin, March 19, 1985, p. 98. Excerpt: “When I die, I hope people will remember me by the proverb: ‘You can always tell a man who is dining out on an expense account by the enthusiasm with which he summons the waiter.’” (Think of the passion of those who advocate government spending.)
  3. Is John Hyde an anarchocapitalist? His essay, “We’re living in the shadow of the 1,010th Commandment,” The Australian Financial Review, April 6, 1984, p. 13, begins: “Democratic government is sometimes spoken of as though it were a voluntary arrangement, which clearly it is not. Its laws are as binding as those of any despotism and often display less regard for non-conformists. The tyranny of the majority is no less tyranny.”
  4. Is Hugh Morgan an anarchocapitalist? In Janine Perrett, “Outspoken mine chief dismisses ‘racist’ tag,” The Australian, May 4, 1984, p. 7, Morgan shows he isn’t soft like most people who call themselves free-market advocates. Is there any reason why Morgan and John Hyde would not respond to this note by Benjamin Marks about why Bert Kelly fans ought to be anarchocapitalists?
  5. Six items featuring John Singleton this week: the Daylight Saving, Profits, The State and Unions chapters from Rip Van Australia; Don Groves, “Ocker Singo Seeks Another Super Sell on New TV Show With Some Mates,” The Sun-Herald, January 21, 1979, p. 11 (where are the recordings of this and other Singo tv shows?); and John Singleton, “Come back Bob – It was all in fun!,” Matilda, May 1985, pp. 14-15, where he says that “the friendship I had with Bob Askin became one of a father and the son he had never had.” I’m interested to hear what those who know Singo think of that. Despite digitising over 150 items featuring him, it still surprised me. So much to learn!
  6. Sinclair Hill and the Workers Party are discussed in this major NSW country publication: “A few ‘chukkas’ in the Senate for polo ace?,” North West Magazine (NSW), week commencing December 8, 1975, p. 2. Were Sinclair Hill, Charles Russell and Lang Hancock ever in the same room at the same time?
  7. Did you know that one of the founders of the Country Party, Charles Russell, chose to end his magnum opus with an endorsement of the policies and professionalism of the Workers Party? The final chapter and the chapter, “Leasehold Wilderness,” which Viv Forbes praised here, are now up. With the collapse of the Soviet Union, does Australia now have more government-owned land than any other country?
  8. Ron Manners in 1981 told readers of The Bulletin to put their property where the taxman can’t find it. How radical is that!
  9. David Sharp continues his great series of introductions to economics, this week on the important topic of prices.
  10. Viv Forbes, at the request of John Singleton, wrote this brilliant article on the libertarian position on smoking. Someone needs to pressure Viv Forbes into writing about all the major free-market advocates in Australia, including, of course, himself! The more I learn and discover, the more questions I have.
  11. Help please! It was widely reported that in a three-column interview in a Labor-friendly London publication called The People in 1941 Robert Menzies said: “I always tell my Opposition friends that the only difference between us is that I am theoretically non-Socialist, yet an amazingly practical Socialist, while they are theoretical Socialists. People will take things from us they wouldn’t take from the Labor party. That is outstandingly true in Australia … You get two views which, in theory, are violently opposed. In practice the extreme course of to-day is a commonplace of to-morrow.” Did Menzies really say it? What was the full context? Does anyone have a contact in London who can please track this down for me?
(in order of appearance on Economics.org.au)
  1. Opening Salvo: Week 1 List
  2. Week 2 List
  3. Week 3
  4. Week 4
  5. Week 5
  6. Week 6
  7. Week 7
  8. Week 8
  9. Week 9
  10. Week 10
  11. Week 11
  12. Week 12
  13. Week 13
  14. Week 14
  15. Week 15
  16. Week 16
  17. Week 17
  18. Week 18
  19. Week 19
  20. Week 20
  21. Week 21
  22. Week 22
  23. Week 23
  24. Week 24
  25. Week 25: New Year's Edition
  26. Special Sunday Edition
  27. Special Penthouse Edition
  28. Rip Van Australia Day Special
  29. Safe for Work Playboy Edition
  30. Week 30
  31. Week 3,188
  32. Week 32
  33. Week 33: Vale Ronald Kitching
  34. Week 34
  35. Week 35
  36. Week 36
  37. Week 37
  38. Week 38
  39. Week 39
  40. Week 40
  41. Week 41
  42. Week 42: Relaunch
  43. Week 43
  44. Week 44
  45. Week 45
  46. Week 46
  47. Week 47
  48. Week 48
  49. Week 49
  50. Week 50 of Economics.org.au = Mises Seminar - 17 weeks
  51. Week 51 of Economics.org.au = Mises Seminar - 16 weeks
  52. Week 52 of Economics.org.au = Mises Seminar - 15 weeks
  53. Week 53 of Economics.org.au = Mises Seminar - 14 weeks
  54. Week 54 of Economics.org.au = Mises Seminar - 13 weeks
  55. Week 55
  56. Week 56
  57. Week 57 of Economics.org.au = Mises Seminar - 10 weeks
  58. Week 58 of Economics.org.au
  59. Week 59 of Economics.org.au
  60. Week 60 of Economics.org.au
  61. Week 61 of Economics.org.au
  62. Week 62 of Economics.org.au
  63. Week 63 of Economics.org.au
  64. Week 64 of Economics.org.au
  65. Week 65 of Economics.org.au
  66. Week 66 of Economics.org.au
  67. Week 67 of Economics.org.au
  68. Week 68 of Economics.org.au
  69. Week 69 of Economics.org.au
  70. Week 70 of Economics.org.au
  71. Week 71 of Economics.org.au
  72. Week 72 of Economics.org.au
  73. Week 73 of Economics.org.au
  74. Week 74 of Economics.org.au
  75. Vale Neville Kennard:
    Week 75 of Economics.org.au
  76. Week 76 of Economics.org.au
  77. Week 77 of Economics.org.au
  78. Week 78 of Economics.org.au
  79. Week 79 of Economics.org.au
  80. Week 80 of Economics.org.au
  81. Week 81 of Economics.org.au
  82. Week 82 of Economics.org.au
  83. Week 83 of Economics.org.au
  84. Week 84 of Economics.org.au
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