John Hurst, Nation Review, July 21-27, 1977, p. 11.

Max Newton is living comfortably in his Toorak mansion on an income — mainly from pop magazines — of between $30,000 and $40,000 a month. He says he is struggling. He has a swimming pool and a parttime handyman-gardener to keep his lawns and flower beds in trim. Nevertheless he’s struggling, or as he puts it, “surviving from day to day”. It’s all very sad really. All things being relative 40 thou must seem a pittance when you’ve known better days and Max has known better days. He was making a lot more in his heyday as publisher of assorted comics and the weekly sex and scandal sheet, the Sunday Observer.

About ten weeks ago, he says, his earnings were almost nothing. He had just been relieved of his responsibilities as publisher by E. O. Smith, the Sydney accountants acting as administrators for creditors of his companies, and Max gives the impression he didn’t know where his next quid was coming from.

Under the new ownership of Peter Isaacson Publications, in which the Herald and Weekly Times have an interest, the Observer is tamer although it still displays the tits and bums and columns of titillation Max made famous. Sunday morning without “Mad Max” must be very dull for the thousands who eagerly awaited his violently hysterical column branding politicians as rats, liars, fools, mountebanks or communists. Max is no longer very interested. He seems to want to forget that he had anything to do with it:

It could be argued that I could have done something more interesting or demanding. But too fucking bad. It’s over.

I used to regard papers like Truth and the Mirror as poor. I could never find anything in them worth reading. I didn’t know anything about popular journalism. I couldn’t work out how they did it. But in 1971 when Gordon Barton’s Sunday Observer flopped it seemed to me there was an opportunity to get control of a big selling paper for very little money. It seemed a good business opportunity.

It was a pretty straight family tabloid at first. The Observer only really became violent in the 18 months after John Sorrell (former editor) left. A former sub on the Herald, John Brook, and another bloke, a New Zealander, made it more violent. I didn’t particularly like it, but I’ve always tried to give talented journalists their head. It’s too late to argue the point. I didn’t interfere with what they did and used to encourage them from time to time.

I’ve always written in violent terms about politics. I used to do a column in the Financial Review called “Canberra Observed” by Cato which was the most violent piece of political writing in the 50s or 60s. I’ve always been in trouble because of the violence with which I’ve written. I like stirring people up.

I think it’s the function of political journalists. The only subjects I’ve written about are politics and money. It’s the function of political and economic journalists to attack all the established power sources.

I’ve always taken the view that in this country established power is very settled and happy with itself and there aren’t too many people in a position to criticise or try to bring down people in power. I’ve always detested people having power over me or any other human being, no matter their political colour, and I’ve tried to bring them down and make them fight each other and suspicious of each other and expose them in any way I can. I’ve always worked on a no holds barred basis.

Journalists never need worry about something to do while they have that permanent function of making life uncomfortable for people in power. The idea that journalists can be objective is a self-deception on a grand scale and the sooner we recognise the extent of our own huge bias the better. That’s why I disliked the postures and pretensions of Perkin (Graham Perkin, later editor of the Age). The whole Perkin mystique was vomit making. He was a puffed up pretender who put out a so-called objective newspaper which was nothing more than a mouthpiece for the socialist left.

Be praised, be damned but never be ignored was Max’s philosophy. He expected to be sued for libel and so he was, frequently. ACTU president, Bob Hawke, who went to the same school and university in Western Australia as Max, was among those who got money out of him. He still detests Hawke. He sneers at the bastardised dingo degree of B. Litt. which Hawke, a Rhodes scholar, got at Oxford while Max was getting a first at Cambridge, and at Hawke’s intellectual pretensions.

What Hawke does is to become associated with people who are his intellectual inferiors by a mile, bully them mercilessly, and then allocate to himself from that “no contest” position the prize of being an intellectual.

An old mate of mine, John (now Senator) Wheeldon — a very funny, very talented man though I disagree with him politically, would eat Hawke intellectually. Hawke is a bloody good salesman, always has been. He got his guernsey on the ACTU research staff with the help of Horrie Brown, the Australian statistician who conceived the Australian National Income Accounts. He was then able to do a pioneering job browbeating judges in the Arbitration Commission.

Hawke regarding Newton with equal if not greater disdain. Most of the time he behaves as if Max was not there, which must rankle with a man who hates being ignored.

When Max ran the Observer on the formula of tits, TAB, trots, footy and the private lives of nymphomaniacs and starlets the results made him look like a mini tycoon. Circulation and revenue went up from 95,000 & $25,000 in September 1973, to 160,000 & $60,000 by the end of 1974. The selling price had gone up from 25 cents to 40 cents but it didn’t seem to matter. There were always more people who wanted Max’s frills and vicarious thrills in preference to the rival rag, the bland Sunday Press.

What went wrong, says Max, is that he was too impetuous in the purchase of new printing plant in 1974 and 1975. The fantastic increases in the price of newsprint also hit hard. The creditors moved in.

Max had to enter a scheme of arrangement with creditors of his companies to sort out debts amounting to millions. “After the holocaust over at Richmond there was every possibility I would be ruined and bankrupt,” he says. He has had to give person guarantees on plant purchases in excess of $3 million. He has no idea what the sale of the plant will bring. He says he has not been told.

He puts the losses incurred between 1973 and the scheme of arrangement with creditors in 1976 at between one and a half and two million dollars. Reports that debts of his companies amount to six million dollars have been exaggerated. “A journalist I trained made that mistake because he added up the total debts of the scheme companies forgetting that about two thirds were inter-company debts,” he says.

The tax department is also after him for $204,000 allegedly underpaid over the past seven years. He suggested to them facetiously that they might as well make it a round figure of one million dollars to compound his problems. He still has a lot of cheek.

It’s all very trying but he’s not complaining overmuch. He is bringing out magazines like Teen Beat, Pop Quiz, Super Star 77 and a thing on the Skyhooks, selling for about one dollar to $1.25, and has plans to revert to the serious scoop journalism he wrote or organised as political correspondent for the Sydney Morning Herald, as managing editor of the Financial Review and Australian in the 50s and 60s. “I hope to put up a paper which will deal with the serious subjects of money, politics, economic policy, the unions, industry and banks complex — the power setup — on a basis which will make it completely immune from libel.”

He will never run a daily newspaper again, he says, and he couldn’t work again for one of the big groups. He’s too much of a maverick.

I got very sick of the bureaucratic setup at Fairfax and News Ltd. The whole time I was working for Fairfax and Rupert Murdoch I had a running battle against the managers who tried to tell me what I could or could not say. I’ve never been able to stomach it.

I’ve always been very wilful and I’ve paid and paid and paid for that attitude, but I’ve not changed it. Rupert Henderson (managing director of John Fairfax Ltd) was a man of tremendous insight and political and editorial skill and an inspiration to me, but many times he thought I was mad in the way I carried on. He said I could not be controlled. He kept saying to me that I had to stay on at Fairfax and become one of the leaders of the company, if not the leader, but I never had any tact, any self-discipline.

With Henderson and other Sydney Morning Herald executives, Newton supported former Country Party leader Jack McEwen, against Menzies when Ming was backing British entry into the common market. There were, he says, many rows about that.

With the support of Henderson and Warwick Fairfax, he campaigned for Arthur Calwell against Menzies in the 1961 election and Ming scraped home by one seat. He wanted to do it again in 1963, but the economy had improved and Fairfax was against it and Max got out and joined Murdoch.

On all matter of policy I found Rupert to be very superficial. Of course, that does not matter a bugger in my opinion, so far as the success of Rupert’s enterprises is concerned. His great flair is his ability to gamble, his courage and judgment. What I found a fault and a lot of other people did not give a fuck about was his overriding sense of intellectual inferiority, which makes it very uncomfortable for anybody to talk to him about matters of policy.

A more general fault is his capriciousness in his relations with employees. He chews journalists up and spits them out all the time. That does not seem to affect the editorial success of his publications, so who am I to say he is wrong. But I found it impossible to work for him on an ongoing basis because of his contempt for serious journalistic standards. Rupert really has no time for that. He is too busy promoting the growth of his publications. He has shown much greater loyalty to the managerial people — the production people and financial controllers, rather than for editorial people.

Generally Max has no time for politicians.

They have to be rats and liars because they are required to reconcile all the aspirations of conflicting groups into some workable synthesis. The only politician I ever had any time for was Bert Kelly, the Member for Wakefield, SA, who conducted a lone, thankless campaign in favour of low tariffs with no hope of preferment under Menzies. I find it appalling that anybody can regard it as a credible proposition that our national problems will be solved by politicians.

For a while, in 1975, he was director of the Workers Party. “But I did that for a mate, John Singleton (Chairman of the Party), who wanted me to give him a hand. It was a real pain. Journalists should be outside the whole political thing.” (Max fell out with the Workers Party when he referred to Jim Spigelman, secretary of Whitlam’s media department, as “a little Jew boy”.)

Although once a firstclass scholar, he has a lot of contempt for academics. The Australian academic community is characterised, he says, by laziness, bitchiness, derivative thought patterns, frustration and suffers from “a collective dose of the Poor Mes”.

The only people — apart from himself and a few friends — who he seems to think have much intellect are public servants, the source of many of his leaks when he ran the Canberra newsletter Incentive. In those days he scared the shit out of politicians with leaks from treasury and other departments. It caused his former ally against Menzies, Black Jack McEwen, to denounce him as a Japanese spy. The Commonwealth Police raided his office to seize files. “But they made a balls of that,” he says.

The clue to Newton’s erratic, some say paranoid or psychotic behaviour, is the influence of drugs and booze, which he admits got a bad hold over him. “For 25 years of my life I was addicted to drugs and alcohol which had the effect of blotting out reality,” he says.

He’s kicked the habit how and is sceptical of taking aspirin. Feet up, spreadeagled on the settee, he looks calmer — almost placid until he lets his guard down — certainly more congenial than in the hectic days at the Observer when he ranted and raved at journalists he would call mate in his occasionally good moods. In those days, he says, he was in a rage for virtually 24 hours a day and sought refuge in booze, tranquillisers and sleeping pills because he could not cope with the anxiety and tension.

I was on benders with the Observer in 1972 and 1973. I became suicidal. At a time of very great business stress and the breakdown of my first family, I had to be hospitalised suffering from acute alcoholic poisoning. Fortunately, with help, I’ve been able to remain on the path of recovery. There’s no fucking permanent recovery.

Characteristically, people addicted to booze and drugs are emotionally immature. That’s why I could not get on in organisations like Fairfax and News Ltd. It was not that I was some fucking high-minded man of principle. I was a very difficult person to get along with because I was emotionally very immature. By the time I was 44 I was no more emotionally mature than when I was 14. It’s only in recent years that I’ve been able to learn anything about how to acquire a degree of emotional maturity.

To me emotional immaturity is characterised by the following emotions dominating one’s life: unreasoning fear, guilt, hate, anger, envy, self pity and depression.

It sounds a bit like the seven deadly sins muttered by Max from the confessional.

I suffered from guilt when I was a little boy. I came from a very strict Methodist household where guilt was very deeply ingrained in the whole family attitudes. But it would not be fair to explain my feelings of guilt purely be reference to the Methodist Church. The causes of irrational guilt are a lot more subtle than attending the Methodist Church since the age of four. This illness of self pity, guilt and fear is more likely some sort of arrested emotional development which nobody knows anything about.

Hate and envy?

Well, if there was any setback it was due to “THEM”. The person who suffers in this way has a virtually non-existent ability to be honestly self-appraising. If you have a setback, you say: “It’s those bastards — it’s them.”

He laughs at himself:

Fucking THEM.

I think that this attitude showed itself in my writing. It was almost like public vomit.

Newton says he feels calmest when he can regard life as a game, a kind of Swiftian black joke:

I can take things bloody seriously and have taken things obsessively. But I feel happiest and most relaxed when I can stand off from it all and see how trivial most of the things one got worked up about were and are. I suppose I’ve changed my priorities. My priorities and more to do with family life than they were.

My first family was never very satisfactory — nothing to do with my wife or children but to do with me. There are so many people who have not been able to cope with tension and anxiety and have carried it over into their family life and ruined it. I’ve had this opportunity to have another family and enjoy family life in the past few years in a way that was not possible before.

In the past three years I’ve had more “objective” type disasters than in the rest of my life put together. And yet over this period I’ve been able to become calmer in relation to those facts than at any other time. I’m trying to live calmly and free of fear.

With the alcoholic, suicide is just outside the door, never very far away. No matter how well have may became he has to apply himself to a program of self-development.

We need to conduct a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.

In his time Max has been a clever, energetic journalist, a reputation no one can deny him however much they hate him. It’s hard to believe his suggestion that his rave period with the Observer was simply a gigantic aberration from the norm. But he’s not making many excuses, he knows the other devils inside his thick hide and he’s trying for something better.

(in order of appearance on Economics.org.au)
  1. Advance Australia fascist: The forces that make Australia a fascist country
  2. The Economic Guerrillas: A lecture in honour of Maxwell Newton
  3. Maxwell Newton Audio at Mises.org
  4. Max Newton on Video at first Mises Institute Conference (1983)
  5. Up the Workers! Bob Howard's 1979 Workers Party Reflection in Playboy
  6. Max Newton stars in Ron Paul video
  7. Bunny of the Welfare State
  8. The Crumbling Oligarchies
  9. Is Australia So Bad That It Can't Get Worse?
  10. Max Newton: Cauldron-Journalist
  11. Max Newton: a muckraker makes good
  12. An open letter to Bob Hawke, B. Litt., Oxon; from Maxwell Newton, B. A., Cantab.: In black and white
  13. Welfare Creates Poverty
  14. Welfare State a National Disgrace
  15. A "spy" replies
  16. Ron Manners on the Workers Party
  17. Josh Frydenberg vs Maxwell Newton on Sir Robert Menzies
  18. The traumatic birth of a daily
  19. The Bulletin on Maxwell Newton as Workers Party national spokesman on economics and politics
  20. Menzies: A Legacy of Lies and Legislation Limiting Liberalism
  21. Max Newton: Maverick in Exile
  22. King Leonard of Hutt River Declares Defensive Just War Against Australia the Aggressor
  23. Crying in the wilderness
  24. State aid and the privileged
  25. Maxwell Newton on Reg Ansett
  26. How to stop Labor running wild
  27. 1975 Max Newton-Ash Long interview on the Workers Party
  28. The Working Journalist in Public Administration
  29. Max Newton: controversy is an asset
  30. Maxwell Newton chapter of Clyde Packer's No Return Ticket (1984)
  31. The "irresponsible" way is the only way
  32. Maxwell Newton on Moral Hazard
  33. Maxwell Newton on Handout America and unbridled Welfare Mania in 1980 New York Post
  34. Tony Dear on Paul Krutulis, the Workers Party and murder
  35. Max Newton on the gold standard
  36. Maxwell Newton on ideas for cutting government waste
  37. Maxwell Newton on Bureaucracy
  38. Maxwell Newton measures bullshit tertiary schooling
  39. Australia's biggest newspaper insider on manipulating the media
  40. Never put your faith in politicians
  41. Profiting from propaganda
Powered by Hackadelic Sliding Notes 1.6.5
(in order of appearance on Economics.org.au)
  1. Bert Kelly on his journalism
  2. Move for a body of Modest Members
  3. Modest Members Association
  4. Bert Kelly's Maiden Parliamentary Speech
  5. Government Intervention
  6. 1976 Monday Conference transcript featuring Bert Kelly
  7. Bert Kelly, Hayek and Mencken on the virtues of farmers
  8. Sound economics calls for quiet from government
  9. Petrol for Farmers
  10. Some Sacred Cows
  11. Experiences in Parliament
  12. Spending your Money
  13. Is Taxmania a politician fetish?
  14. How Bert Kelly repays a free feed
  15. Modest column #898
  16. Chicken-hearted feathered friends strange bedfellows on a feather bed?
  17. Who needs literary licence?
  18. A touch of Fred's anarchy
  19. Helping the farmers help themselves
  20. Standing on the shoulders of the downtrodden
  21. Supply and Demand
  22. Bert Kelly responds to claims he is arrogant and uncredentialed
  23. Politics: it's a very confusing business
  24. The best featherbeds run on rails
  25. Bert Kelly on Disaster Relief
  26. Bert Kelly Wants to Secede
  27. Blinded by their tears
  28. Anti-freedom pro-tobacco industry lobby harmed Australia
  29. Under Labor, is working hard foolish?
  30. An Idiot's Guide to Interventionism
  31. Is free healthcare worthless?
  32. Can government kiss it better?
  33. Bert Kelly Destroys the Side Benefits Argument for Government
  34. Bert Kelly gets his head around big-headed bird-brained politics
  35. First Modest Member (Bert Kelly) AFR Column
  36. Second Modest Member (Bert Kelly) AFR Column
  37. Third Modest Member (Bert Kelly) AFR Column
  38. Fourth Modest Member (Bert Kelly) AFR Column
  39. Fifth Modest Member (Bert Kelly) AFR Column
  40. Sixth Modest Member (Bert Kelly) AFR Column
  41. Bert Kelly on the 2011 Budget and Australia's Pathetic Journalists and Politicians
  42. Bert Kelly, Bastard or Simple Sod?
  43. Liberal Backbencher Hits Govt. Over Import Restrictions
  44. Bert Kelly feels a dam coming on at each election
  45. Bert Kelly Enters Parliament
  46. Why take in one another's washing?
  47. Bert Kelly breaks the law, disrespects government and enjoys it
  48. Gillard's galley-powered waterskiing
  49. State Premiers are always asking for more taxing powers
  50. Can price control really work?
  51. Should we put up with socialism?
  52. We're quick to get sick of socialism
  53. Time the protection racket ended
  54. Can't pull the wool over Farmer Fred
  55. People not Politics
  56. Bert Kelly admits he should have had less faith in politicians
  57. The inspirational incentivising Dear Leader Gough Whitlam
  58. Labor: a girl who couldn't say no
  59. Why leading businessmen carry black briefcases
  60. Ludwig von Mises on page 3 of AFR
  61. Bert Kelly's empowering feminism
  62. Mavis wants the Modest Member to dedicate his book to her
  63. What if the whole country is swindled?
  64. Moss Cass: "Flood plains are for floods"
  65. A worm's eye view
  66. Eccles returns to haunt us
  67. How to grip a politician's ear
  68. It's hard to digest this economic cake
  69. Time to Butcher "Aussie Beef"
  70. Cold water on government-instigated irrigation schemes
  71. Hooray for Ord River Dam!
  72. Tariffs paid by exporters
  73. The problem of principles v popularity
  74. If you support State Quotas, where will your logic take you?
  75. Against guidance by government
  76. A socialist in Liberal clothing
  77. Never ask the government to help
  78. Don't listen to economists!
  79. Whitlam's July 1973 25% tariff cut
  80. Bert Kelly on Import Quotas
  81. Good directions when government backseat driving, like reversing down wrong side of road
  82. Barriers to imports are barriers to exports
  83. Bert Kelly reviews The War Diaries of Weary Dunlop
  84. Bert Kelly reviews We Were There
  85. Tariffs get the fork-tongue treatment
  86. Bert Kelly reduces government to its absurdities
  87. Politician sacrifices his ... honesty
  88. It's all a matter of principle
  89. Bert Kelly Destroys the Infant Industry Argument
  90. Bert Kelly Untangles Tariff Torment
  91. Bert Kelly resorts to prayer
  92. Eccles keeps our nose hard down on the tariff grindstone
  93. "Don't you believe in protecting us against imports from cheap labour countries?"
  94. Even if lucky, we needn't be stupid
  95. Great "freedom of choice" mystery
  96. Small government's growth problem
  97. I like my kind acts to get a mention in the press
  98. A Modest Member rakes the embers
  99. Tariffs Introduced
  100. More About Tariffs
  101. Sacred cow kicker into print
  102. Bert Kelly's 1984 two-article quote-collection on Aboriginal policies
  103. Modest Member must not give up
  104. Traditional Wheat Farming is Our Birthright and Heritage and Must be Protected!
  105. Tariff-cut nonsense lives on
  106. Bert Kelly brilliantly defends "theoretical academics"
  107. The high cost of protection
  108. Generosity creates problems
  109. The Society of Modest Members
  110. John Hyde's illogical, soft, complicated, unfocussed and unsuccessful attempt to communicate why he defends markets
  111. Modesty ablaze
  112. Case for ministers staying home
  113. The unusual self-evident simplicity of the Modest Members Society
  114. Animal lib the new scourge of the bush
  115. The Association for the Prevention of Cruelty to Krill
  116. modest members society
  117. Repeal economic laws, force people to buy new cars and enforce tariffs against overseas tennis players
  118. Thoughts on how to kill dinosaurs
  119. Let's try the chill winds
  120. Taking the Right's road
  121. Bert Kelly: "I did not try often or hard enough"
  122. Bert Kelly "lacked ... guts and wisdom"
  123. A look at life without tariffs
  124. The Gospel according to Bert
  125. Tiny note on Bert Kelly's column in The Bulletin in 1985
  126. Why costs can't be guaranteed
  127. Hitting out with a halo
  128. Paying farmers not to grow crops will save on subsidies, revenge tariffs, etc
  129. "The Modest Farmer joins us" | "How The Modest Farmer came to be"
  130. Bert Kelly Destroys the Freeloading Justifies Government Argument
  131. Industrial Relations Club shovellers
  132. From Shann to Stone
  133. Government Intervention
    vs
    Government Interference
  134. A sojourn in the real world
  135. The tariff wind swings
  136. Bigger Cake = Bigger Slices
  137. Bert Kelly on the Political Process
  138. A charabanc called protection
  139. Taken for a ride - to nowhere
  140. Down hill, in circles, all the way
  141. Relationships with the Liberal Party
  142. Tariffs = High Prices + World War
  143. Bert Kelly's Family History
  144. Bert Kelly's Pre-Parliament Life
  145. What the MP could say to the Bishop
  146. Why Bert Kelly was not even more publicly outspoken
  147. WEATHER IS USUALLY UNUSUAL
  148. How to stand aside when it's time to be counted
  149. How the Modest Member went back to being a Modest Farmer
  150. My pearls of wisdom were dull beyond belief
  151. Bert Kelly on Political Football
  152. Undigested morsels in Fraser spew
  153. Bert Kelly on LSD
  154. Bert Kelly reflects on the Australian car industry in 1992
  155. Bert Kelly wants reprinted Shann's Economic History of Australia
  156. If tariffs are opposed here then why not there?
  157. The emperor has no textiles, clothing and footwear sense
  158. Ross Gittins Wins Bert Kelly Award
  159. Interesting 1964 Bert Kelly speech: he says he is not a free trader and that he supports protection!
  160. This is the wall the Right built
  161. Tariff Protection in Australia (1970)
  162. Has Santa socked it to car makers?
  163. Is the Budget a cargo cult?
  164. Will we end up subsidising one another?
  165. Keeping the bucket of worms alive
  166. Can we get off the stomach-churning head-spinning tariff merry-go-round?
  167. Do we want our money to fly?
  168. Can a bear be sure of a feed?
  169. How to impress your MP -
    ambush him
  170. The time for being nice to our MPs has gone ...
  171. Don't feel sorry for him -
    hang on to his ear
  172. Trade wars can easily end up on a battlefield
  173. Tariffs Create Unemployment
  174. Bert Kelly recommends Ayn Rand
  175. Bert Kelly on Alf Rattigan's Industry Assistance: The Inside Story
  176. Bert Kelly's Satirical Prophecy: Minister for Meteorology (tick) and High Protectionist Policies to Result in War Yet Again (?)
  177. Bert Kelly in 1972 on Foreign Ownership of Australian Farmland and Warren Truss, Barnaby Joyce and Bill Heffernan in 2012
  178. Bert Kelly baits Welfare State Tiger
  179. Why does Govt wear two faces?
  180. Parliament a place for pragmatists
  181. Of Sugar Wells and Think-Tanks
  182. Bert Kelly: "I must take some of the blame"
  183. Bert Kelly on dumping duties
  184. The Govt's helping hand often hurts
  185. Unbuckling the hobbles on the motor industry
  186. A Modest Farmer looks at the Problems of Structural Change
  187. Government Fails Spectacularly
  188. Know your proper place if you want the quiet life
  189. Bert Kelly on political speech writers
  190. Having your cake and eating it
  191. Perish the thawed!
  192. Hooray for Northern Development!
  193. The silly image of our MPs
  194. Bert Kelly Question Time highlights
  195. Modest Farmer sees his ideas take hold
  196. Should facts stand in the way of a good story?
  197. Fondling one another's glass haloes
  198. What is the sense in making the effort to look after yourself?
  199. Fred's Feeling: Counterpatriotic country contrarian
  200. Handouts for big boys only
  201. Mavis trying to buy a hand loom
  202. Bad news for bearers of bad news
  203. Is it time to get aboard the tariff band-waggon?
  204. Why farmers resent tariff protection for motor makers
  205. A sordid use of scare tactics
  206. Goods vs services
  207. Tariffs are hilariously counterproductive
  208. Bert Kelly on decentralisation
  209. Inflation breeds moral decay
  210. Who envies equality?
  211. Growth – malignant or benign?
  212. Government wiser than Magna Carta
  213. Bert Kelly on looking to politicians for moral leadership
  214. Max Newton: Maverick in Exile
  215. Whitlam & co on the Dismissal
  216. 25% Tariff Cut
  217. Bert Kelly on pensions
  218. Mr Clunies-Ross of the Cocos Islands should rule Australia
  219. They get the wind up when it changes
  220. Why the Big Green Lie survives
  221. Ross McLean in 1982: "Malcolm! Why don't we try good government? It might be popular."
  222. Bert Kelly on the importance of exchange rate movements
  223. Bert Kelly shows how to attack
  224. Bert Kelly vs Bert Kelly vs Bert Kelly
  225. Industrial relations dinosaur, Bruce, chews his cud
  226. Hooray for "firmly entrenched"!
  227. Respect your dinosaurs
  228. What if something is "deeply ingrained" yet harmful?
  229. A case for ministerial inertia
  230. Why politicians don't like the truth
  231. Our great open spaces
  232. Ominous dark clouds are gathering
  233. Better to be popular than right
  234. Crying in the wilderness
  235. Ivory tower needs thumping
  236. Bert Kelly asks, "How can you believe in free enterprise and government intervention at the same time?"
  237. Politicians get undeserved praise, why not undeserved blame too?
  238. Feet in a bucket of champagne
  239. Rural Problems
  240. Health cover needs a $30 excess clause
  241. Unholy state of taxation
  242. Boring economics worth a smile
  243. The Libido for the Miserable
  244. Agricultural Development and Tariffs
  245. Fred's too poor to have principles
  246. Eccles Law of the constant wage share
  247. "He whom the gods would destroy ..."
  248. Tariffs: when to wean infant BHP?
  249. Keep any government as far as possible from farming
  250. The Playford charade is out of date
  251. Bert Kelly: the odd man out who's now in
  252. Dries must resist giving up struggle as going gets tough
  253. How a well meaning Government can be so stupid
  254. The icing on the economic cake
  255. Sir Roderick Carnegie's foreword to Bert Kelly's Economics Made Easy
  256. The Vale of Popularity and the Protection Procession
  257. Politics 101: Pay Lip Service to Capitalism and Shoot the Messenger
  258. Bert Kelly makes politicians eat their own words on tariffs, then says, "We cannot be blamed for treating the statements of our statesmen with cynical contempt"
  259. Bert Kelly on Free Enterprise
  260. Cartoons of protected industry, the welfare teat and the nanny state
  261. Bert Kelly on the theory of constant shares and the Fabian Society
  262. Bert Kelly vs Doug Anthony
  263. You're lucky if you escape being helped by government
  264. Bert Kelly on Small Farmers
  265. Bert Kelly on Apathy
  266. Bert Kelly in 1967 on "problems of government and things like that"
  267. The last "Dave's Diary"
  268. Bert Kelly vs The Australian on tariffs in 1977
  269. Bounties or Tariffs, Someone Pays
  270. Geriatric companies without a minder
  271. A free marketeer wary of free trade
  272. Nixon's puzzling profession of faith
  273. "Ford ... seems to spend more time bending its knees than its back"
  274. Clyde Cameron's weak ways with wise words
  275. Why flaunt what others flout?
  276. Bert Kelly yearns for Tim Flannery's powers of prediction
  277. Looking after yourself is silly
  278. Bert Kelly masterpiece on drought, fire, flood and other natural disaster relief schemes
  279. Government can take credit for our car industry mess
  280. Car makers want the 4wd driven deeper into tariff bog
  281. Why our MP is no longer prone to a good sob story
  282. Auto industry is in a straitjacket
  283. Bert Kelly on market predictions
  284. Why should dryland farmers subsidise irrigation farmers?
  285. How much should government decrease incentive for independence from government?
  286. Clarkson crowned Deputy Government Whip
  287. Bert Kelly to blame for soaring government healthcare costs
  288. 1959 return of Dave's Diary
  289. Bert Kelly in 1966 on developing northern Australia
  290. Successful government intervention can [sic] occur
  291. Vernon Report upholds Clarkson
  292. Quiet Man Makes An Impact
  293. Should it be compulsory to buy footwear and clothing?
  294. To save Australian clothing industry women must all wear same uniform
  295. Don't confuse plucking heart strings with plucking harp strings
  296. Speech only for public
  297. Catchy Tariff Circus Extravaganza
  298. Bert Kelly in 1985 on cars yet again
  299. Hurrah for the Gang of Five
  300. Thoughts on a verse about Balfour
  301. Bert Kelly pep talk to politicians
  302. Government intervention = Agony postponed but death brought nearer
  303. Recipe for disaster: Freeze!
  304. Recipe for government intervention: Gather winners and scatter losers
  305. Recipe for industry destruction: Blanket market signals
  306. Mavis writes!
  307. Bert Kelly's empiricism is not kneejerk reaction kind
  308. The $2,000 song of the shirt worker
  309. Subsiding only small farmers means subsiding the big banks
  310. Difficult to be fast on your feet when you've got your ear to the ground
  311. It would surprise people to see how sensible MPs behave if they think they are not being watched
  312. Bert Kelly on "this land of limitless resources" and "great open spaces"
  313. Growing bananas at the South Pole
  314. Car components tariff protection under fire
  315. Why carry a $300m car subsidy?
  316. Tariff feather beds for the foreign giants
  317. Bert Kelly says end compulsory voting to stop donkey vote
  318. Perhaps being smart and insured isn't all luck
  319. You gets your tariff, you pays a price
  320. More funds to train Olympians?
  321. Fire in their guts and wind in ours
  322. Should free universal healthcare include pets?
  323. Sound advice from a modest farmer
  324. A tottering monument to intervention
  325. Cunning meets wisdom
  326. Competition, Aussie-style: Who's the bigger parasite?
  327. Australians are proud patriotic parasites, says Bert Kelly
  328. Taxpayer-funded sport is cheating
  329. Being loved by all is not always a good thing
  330. Welfare State Destroys Society
  331. 1980 Bert Kelly feather bed series
  332. The White Mice Marketing Board
  333. Government intervention and advice can be harmful, even when right, even for those it tries to help
  334. One small step on the compulsory voting landmine
  335. The free & compulsory education sacred cows have no clothes
  336. Holding a loaded wallet to an economist's head
  337. Political No Man's Land
  338. Only blind greed demands both equality and prosperity
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(in order of appearance on Economics.org.au)
  1. Governments Consume Wealth — They Don't Create It
  2. Singo and Howard Propose Privatising Bondi Beach
  3. Singo and Howard Speak Out Against the Crackpot Realism of the CIS and IPA
  4. Singo and Howard on Compromise
  5. Singo and Howard on Monopolies
  6. Singo and Howard Support Sydney Harbour Bridge Restructure
  7. Singo and Howard on Striking at the Root, and the Failure of Howard, the CIS and the IPA
  8. Singo and Howard Explain Why Australia is Not a Capitalist Country
  9. Singo and Howard Call Democracy Tyrannical
  10. Singo and Howard on Drugs!
  11. Simpleton sells his poll philosophy
  12. Singo and Howard Decry Australia Day
  13. Singo and Howard Endorse the Workers Party
  14. Singo and Howard Oppose the Liberal Party
  15. Singo and Howard Admit that Liberals Advocate and Commit Crime
  16. Up the Workers! Bob Howard's 1979 Workers Party Reflection in Playboy
  17. John Whiting's Inaugural Workers Party Presidential Address
  18. John Singleton and Bob Howard 1975 Monday Conference TV Interview on the Workers Party
  19. Singo and Howard on Aborigines
  20. Singo and Howard on Conservatism
  21. Singo and Howard on the Labor Party
  22. Singo, Howard and Hancock Want to Secede
  23. John Singleton changes his name
  24. Lang Hancock's Foreword to Rip Van Australia
  25. New party will not tolerate bludgers: Radical party against welfare state
  26. Singo and Howard introduce Rip Van Australia
  27. Singo and Howard on Knee-Jerks
  28. Singo and Howard on Tax Hunts (Lobbying)
  29. Singo and Howard on Rights
  30. Singo and Howard on Crime
  31. Singo and Howard on Justice
  32. Singo and Howard on Unemployment
  33. John Singleton on 1972 cigarette legislation
  34. Singo and Howard: Gambling Should Neither Be Illegal Nor Taxed
  35. Holed up, hold-up and holdout
  36. The libertarian alternative vs the socialist status quo
  37. Workers Party Platform
  38. Singo and Howard Join Forces to Dismantle Welfare State
  39. Singo and Howard on Business
  40. Singo and Howard on Discrimination
  41. Singo and Howard on the Greens
  42. Singo and Howard on Xenophobia
  43. Singo and Howard on Murdoch, Packer and Monopolistic Media
  44. Singo and Howard Explain that Pure Capitalism Solves Pollution
  45. Singo and Howard Defend Miners Against Government
  46. Singo and Howard on Bureaucracy
  47. Singo and Howard on Corporate Capitalism
  48. The last words of Charles Russell
  49. Ted Noffs' Preface to Rip Van Australia
  50. Right-wing anarchists revamping libertarian ideology
  51. Giving a chukka to the Workers Party
  52. Govt "villain" in eyes of new party
  53. "A beautiful time to be starting a new party": Rand fans believe in every man for himself
  54. Introducing the new Workers' Party
  55. Paul Rackemann 1980 Progress Party Election Speech
  56. Lang Hancock 1978 George Negus Interview
  57. Voices of frustration
  58. Policies of Workers Party
  59. Party Promises to Abolish Tax
  60. AAA Tow Truck Co.
  61. Singo and Howard on Context
  62. Singo and Howard Blame Roosevelt for Pearl Harbour
  63. Singo and Howard on Apathy
  64. Workers Party is "not just a funny flash in the pan"
  65. Singo and Howard on Decency
  66. John Singleton in 1971 on the 2010 Federal Election
  67. Matthew, Mark, Luke & John Pty. Ltd. Advertising Agents
  68. Viv Forbes Wins 1986 Adam Smith Award
  69. The writing of the Workers Party platform and the differences between the 1975 Australian and American libertarian movements
  70. Who's Who in the Workers Party
  71. Bob Howard interviewed by Merilyn Giesekam on the Workers Party
  72. A Farewell to Armchair Critics
  73. Sukrit Sabhlok interviews Mark Tier
  74. David Russell Leads 1975 Workers Party Queensland Senate Team
  75. David Russell Workers Party Policy Speech on Brisbane TV
  76. Bludgers need not apply
  77. New party formed "to slash controls"
  78. The Workers Party
  79. Malcolm Turnbull says "the Workers party is a force to be reckoned with"
  80. The great consumer protection trick
  81. The "Workers" speak out
  82. How the whores pretend to be nuns
  83. The Workers Party is a Political Party
  84. Shit State Subsidised Socialist Schooling Should Cease Says Singo
  85. My Journey to Anarchy:
    From political and economic agnostic to anarchocapitalist
  86. Workers Party Reunion Intro
  87. Singo and Howard on Freedom from Government and Other Criminals
  88. Singo and Howard on Young People
  89. Singo and Howard Expose how Government Healthcare Controls Legislate Doctors into Slavery
  90. Singo and Howard Engage with Homosexuality
  91. Singo and Howard Demand Repeal of Libel and Slander Laws
  92. Singo and Howard on Consumer Protection
  93. Singo and Howard on Consistency
  94. Workers Party is born as foe of government
  95. Political branch formed
  96. Government seen by new party as evil
  97. Singo and Howard on Non-Interference
  98. Singo and Howard on Women's Lib
  99. Singo and Howard on Licences
  100. Singo and Howard on Gun Control
  101. Singo and Howard on Human Nature
  102. Singo and Howard on Voting
  103. Singo and Howard on
    Inherited Wealth
  104. Singo and Howard on Education
  105. Singo and Howard on Qualifications
  106. Ron Manners on the Workers Party
  107. Singo and Howard Hate Politicians
  108. Undeserved handouts make Australia the lucky country
  109. A happy story about Aborigines
  110. John Singleton on Political Advertising
  111. Richard Hall, Mike Stanton and Judith James on the Workers Party
  112. Singo Incites Civil Disobedience
  113. How John Singleton Would Make Tony Abbott Prime Minister
  114. The Discipline of Necessity
  115. John Singleton on the first election the Workers Party contested
  116. Libertarians: Radicals on the right
  117. The Bulletin on Maxwell Newton as Workers Party national spokesman on economics and politics
  118. Singo and Howard: Australia Should Pull Out of the Olympics
  119. Singo and Howard Like Foreign Investment
  120. Mark Tier corrects Nation Review on the Workers Party
  121. The impossible dream
  122. Why can't I get away with it?
  123. The bold and boring Lib/Lab shuffle
  124. Time for progress
  125. The loonie right implodes
  126. Max Newton: Maverick in Exile
  127. John Singleton on refusing to do business with criminals and economic illiterates
  128. Censorship should be banned
  129. "Listen, mate, a socialist is a bum"
  130. John Singleton on Advertising
  131. John Singleton on why he did the Hawke re-election campaign
  132. Sinclair Hill calls for dropping a neutron bomb on Canberra
  133. Bob Howard in Reason 1974-77
  134. John Singleton defends ockerism
  135. Singo and Howard talk Civil Disobedience
  136. The Census Con
  137. Singo and Howard Oppose Australian Participation in the Vietnam War
  138. Did John Singleton oppose the mining industry and privatising healthcare in 1990?
  139. Bob Carr in 1981 on John Singleton's political bent
  140. John Singleton-Ita Buttrose interview (1977)
  141. John Singleton on elections: "a Massive One-Day Sale!"
  142. John Hyde's Progress Party praise
  143. King Leonard of Hutt River Declares Defensive Just War Against Australia the Aggressor
  144. Singo says Lang Hancock violated Australia's 11th commandment: Thou Shalt Not Succeed
  145. Singleton: the White Knight of Ockerdom
  146. John Singleton bites into Sinclair Hill's beef
  147. Save Parramatta Road
  148. 1979 news item on new TV show John Singleton With a Lot of Help From His Friends
  149. Smoking, Health and Freedom
  150. Singo and Howard on Unions
  151. Singo and Howard Smash the State
  152. Singo and Howard on the big issue of Daylight Saving
  153. Come back Bob - It was all in fun!
  154. A few "chukkas" in the Senate for polo ace?
  155. Country Rejuvenation - Towards a Better Future
  156. Singo and Howard on Profits, Super Profits and Natural Disasters
  157. John Singleton's 1977 pitch that he be on a committee of one to run the Sydney 1988 Olympics for profit
  158. Thoughts on Land Ownership
  159. 1975 Max Newton-Ash Long interview on the Workers Party
  160. The Electoral Act should allow voters to choose "none of the above"
  161. The great Labor Party platform: first or last, everybody wins a prize
  162. The politics of marketing - laugh now, pay later
  163. Singo and Howard call Australia fascist and worse
  164. The mouse will roar
  165. Viv Forbes and Jim Fryar vs Malcolm Fraser in 1979
  166. Quip, Quote, Rant and Rave: four of Viv Forbes' letters to the editor in The Australian in 1979
  167. Australia's First Official Political Party Poet Laureate: The Progress Party's Ken Hood in 1979
  168. Hancock's playing very hard to get
  169. Harry M. Miller and The Australian disgrace themselves
  170. Ocker ad genius takes punt on art
  171. John Singleton 1976 ocker Monday Conference Max Harris debate
  172. John Singleton mocks university students on civil liberties and freedom of choice in 1971
  173. Murray Rothbard championed on Australian television in 1974 (pre-Workers Party!) by Maureen Nathan
  174. John Singleton profile in 1977 Australian MEN Vogue
  175. I think that I shall never see a telegraph pole as lovely as a tree
  176. Ralph Nader vs John Singleton on Consumer Protection
  177. John Singleton's first two "Think" columns in Newspaper News, 1969
  178. Singo and Howard on Ballet
  179. Product innovation comes first
  180. Protect who from a 'mindless' wife?
  181. A party is born
  182. Tiny Workers' Party gives us a hint
  183. John Singleton on the ad industry, consumerism and innovation
  184. Workers Party Economic Policy Statement, December 1975
  185. Lang Hancock on the Workers Party, secession and States Rights
  186. John Singleton and Howard on Government Largesse
  187. Counterculture must exclude government handouts
  188. John Singleton's 1974 Federal Liberal Election Campaign Ads
  189. John Singleton believes in the Workers Party
  190. Write-up of John Singleton's 1978 speech to the Australian Liberal Students Association
  191. Singo in 1987: "Joh doesn't go far enough ... I want absolute deregulation of the economy"
  192. Maxwell Newton chapter of Clyde Packer's No Return Ticket (1984)
  193. Singo and Howard on Totalitarian Socialism and Voluntary Socialism
  194. Rip Van Australia on Ripoff Vandals Taxing Australia
  195. Singo and Howard beg for tolerance
  196. John Singleton's 1985 advertising comeback
  197. Singo and Howard Demand End to Public Transport
  198. John Singleton and Howard on Fred Nile, Festival of Light, FamilyVoice Australia and the Christian Lobby
  199. Capitalism: Survival of the Fittest
  200. Return Australia Post to Sender
  201. Singo and Howard on Public Utilities
  202. John Singleton and Howard say monarchy should be funded by monarchists alone
  203. John Singleton on cigarette advertising
  204. Singo in 1972 on newspapers' demise
  205. John Singleton farewells Bryce Courtenay
  206. John Singleton on Australian political advertising in 1972
  207. Gortlam rides again
  208. Announcement that Lang Hancock will be guest of honour at the Workers Party launch
  209. John Singleton on trading stamps, idiot housewives and government
  210. 1975 John Singleton-Sir Robert Askin Quadrant Interview
  211. Singo asks two prickly questions
  212. VIOLENCE, TV BAN, DRINK - SINGO SPEAKS HIS MIND
  213. Why John Singleton can't keep a straight face
  214. Why John Singleton Defends Smokers Rights
  215. Tony Dear on Paul Krutulis, the Workers Party and murder
  216. An Ode to Busybodies
  217. Progress Party and Workers Party lead The Australian
  218. How many tits in a tangle?
  219. Viv Forbes in 1978 on loss-making government, the Berlin Wall and misdirected blasts of hot-air
  220. John Singleton wants the Post Office sold and anti-discrimination legislation scrapped
  221. A speech from the Titanic
  222. A crime must have a victim
  223. John Singleton vs Australia Post
  224. Minimum wages the killer
  225. Has Fraser got his priorities all wrong?
  226. John Singleton says "the royal family should be flogged off to the U.S."
  227. John Singleton vs Don Chipp and the Australian Democrats
  228. John Singleton vs Don Lane
  229. John Singleton. Horseracing. Why?
  230. John Singleton's 1986 reflection on the Workers Party
  231. Bob Howard in 1978 on libertarianism in Australia
  232. John Singleton on the stupidity of anti-discrimination laws
  233. Thou shalt know the facts ... before thou shoot off thou mouth
  234. Charity: An Aesop Fable
  235. Bob Howard announces the Workers Party in freeEnterprise
  236. New improved moon
  237. Announcing people ... YES, people!
  238. Creativity in advertising must be pointed dead on target
  239. John Singleton on barriers to, and opportunities for, effective communication
  240. Wayne Garland on John Singleton on Advertising
  241. John Singleton schools ad course
  242. John Singleton: advertising awards
  243. Mr Singleton Goes to Canberra for Australian Playboy
  244. John Singleton on his TV career for Australian Playboy
  245. John Singleton sacked for telling the truth about Medicare
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